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Tue Dec 11, 2018, 01:31 AM

Is the Women's March Melting Down?

Is the Women’s March Melting Down?

Millions of women mobilized against gender inequality and the election of Donald Trump in 2016. But only four of them ended up at the top—and the consequences have been enormous.
By Leah McSweeney and Jacob Siegel


On Nov. 12, 2016, a group of seven women held a meeting in New York. They had never worked together before—in fact, most of them had never met—but they were brought together by what felt like the shared vision of an emerging mission.

There were effectively two different cohorts that day. The first one included Breanne Butler, Karen Waltuch, Vanessa Wruble and Mari Lynn Foulger—a fashion designer turned entrepreneur with a sideline in activist politics, who had assumed the nom de guerre Bob Bland. These four were new acquaintances who had connected in the days since Donald Trump’s election, through political networking on social media. Most of them had filtered through the Pantsuit Nation Facebook group, where a woman in Hawaii named Teresa Shook had days before floated the idea of a female-centered march to protest the incoming administration.
Soon after, Wruble—a Washington, D.C., native who founded OkayAfrica, a digital media platform dedicated to new African music, culture, and politics, with The Roots’ Questlove—reached out to a man she knew named Michael Skolnik. The subject of a New York Times profile the previous year as an “influencer” at the nexus of social activism and celebrity, Skolnik held a powerful though not easily defined role in the world of high-profile activist politics. “It’s very rare to have one person who everyone respects in entertainment, or in politics, or among the grass roots,” said Van Jones, in a 2015 New York Times piece. “But to have one person who’s respected by all three? There isn’t anyone but Michael Skolnik.”

When Wruble relayed her concern that the nascent women’s movement had to substantively include women of color, Skolnik told her he had just the women for her to meet: Carmen Perez and Tamika Mallory. These were recommendations Skolnik could vouch for personally. In effect, he was connecting Wruble to the leadership committee of his own nonprofit—a group called The Gathering for Justice, where he and Mallory sat on the board of directors, and Perez served as the executive director.

In an email to Tablet, Skolnik confirmed this account of the group’s origins. “A few days after the election, I was contacted by Vanessa Wruble, who I have known for many years, asking for help with The Women’s March and specifically with including women of color in leadership,” he wrote. “I recommended that she speak with Tamika Mallory and Carmen Perez, also who I have known for years.”

Linda Sarsour, another colleague from The Gathering for Justice network, was not present for these initial meetings but joined the Women’s March as a co-chair a short time later.

(snip)

According to several sources, it was there—in the first hours of the first meeting for what would become the Women’s March—that something happened that was so shameful to many of those who witnessed it, they chose to bury it like a family secret. Almost two years would pass before anyone present would speak about it.

It was there that, as the women were opening up about their backgrounds and personal investments in creating a resistance movement to Trump, Perez and Mallory allegedly first asserted that Jewish people bore a special collective responsibility as exploiters of black and brown people—and even, according to a close secondhand source, claimed that Jews were proven to have been leaders of the American slave trade. These are canards popularized by The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, a book published by Louis Farrakhan’s Nation of Islam—“the bible of the new anti-Semitism,” according to Henry Louis Gates Jr., who noted in 1992: “Among significant sectors of the black community, this brief has become a credo of a new philosophy of black self-affirmation.”



https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/276694/is-the-womens-march-melting-down




That march can down in flames for all I care anymore. They took something that could have been beautiful and turned it into an "intersectional" and anti-semitic trash heap.

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Arrow 17 replies Author Time Post
Reply Is the Women's March Melting Down? (Original post)
EllieBC Dec 2018 OP
comradebillyboy Dec 2018 #1
still_one Dec 2018 #2
DURHAM D Dec 2018 #3
EllieBC Dec 2018 #9
question everything Dec 2018 #4
SleeplessinSoCal Dec 2018 #5
EllieBC Dec 2018 #8
SleeplessinSoCal Dec 2018 #13
EllieBC Dec 2018 #14
SleeplessinSoCal Dec 2018 #15
MosheFeingold Dec 2018 #10
Behind the Aegis Dec 2018 #12
Princess Turandot Dec 2018 #6
EllieBC Dec 2018 #7
MosheFeingold Dec 2018 #11
Behind the Aegis Dec 2018 #16
EllieBC Dec 2018 #17

Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 01:40 AM

1. Indeed The Woman's March has serious anti-semeitism issues.

and I'm not even Jewish. They have plenty of other issues as well.

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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 01:51 AM

2. That is pure anti-Jewish bullshit, and it doesn't surprise me that would come from Mallory, whose

appears to have great admirations for Louis Farrakhan.

The women's movement is about WOMEN'S rights, and how WOMEN are being discriminated against because of their gender.

I won't address the LIES that Perez and Mallory are spewing about the Jews. That is typical anti-Semitic propaganda, and has no place in the Women's rights movement.

Unless they change the leadership of their movement, and focus on the original goals of the women's march, they will end up as a fringe movement without credibility.


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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 02:00 AM

3. I read this about an hour ago and am glad to see it

posted on DU.

The Grifters are beyond disgusting.

A paragraph from the article -

For her part, Wruble agrees—and has pivoted her energy to a new organization devoted to women’s activism, called March On. “At March On, we approach things from a bottom-up rather than a top-down way. We take the lead from local organizers, and we understand that there’s no one-size-fits-all when it comes to organizing. Our organizers come from all walks of life and backgrounds. We’re diverse and intersectional in ways that people often don’t think about. Many women in red states, for example, couldn’t follow an organizing playbook crafted out of D.C. or New York City. The red states couldn’t participate, for example, in a general ‘women’s strike’—people would lose their jobs.”


From now on I will refer to the women's movement as MARCH ON.

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #3)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 04:55 PM

9. Well it's being discussed in this group but

would likely sink to the bottom in GD. Jewish issues aren’t important if the antisemitism isn’t being committed by the far right. When it’s coming from inside the house this forum acts like it’s not happening or worse plays “what about” games.

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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 02:17 AM

4. Perhaps Goodman and Schwerner should have known that Jewish people were

exploiting black people. They could have stayed home during the Freedom Summer of 1964, and would be alive today.

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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 04:30 AM

5. the Women's March is like a franchise. And completely disconnected from those at the top.

It's bigger than 4 women. It's a worldwide phenom.

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Response to SleeplessinSoCal (Reply #5)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 04:51 PM

8. That doesn't make it ok.

People boycott franchises all the time if the HQ does something vile.

The top of this organization is sick and needs to go.

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Response to EllieBC (Reply #8)

Wed Dec 12, 2018, 02:38 PM

13. Dont trash millions because of 4 most never voted for..

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Response to SleeplessinSoCal (Reply #13)

Wed Dec 12, 2018, 06:42 PM

14. So you are saying we should pick and choose which franchises to

throw under the bus?

I’m throwing this one under. Antisemitism isn’t ok no matter what. I want to say that I’m surprised that somebody is trying to overlook anti-Semitism but I honestly can say that this no longer shocks me.

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Response to EllieBC (Reply #14)

Thu Dec 13, 2018, 05:56 AM

15. I actually don't think the millions of women that helped to form

the resistance to trump. Throwing the baby out with the bathwater comes to mind.

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Response to SleeplessinSoCal (Reply #5)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 05:57 PM

10. So is Chick-fil-a

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Response to SleeplessinSoCal (Reply #5)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 06:37 PM

12. Two words for you: PAPA JOHN'S

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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 05:37 AM

6. Here's the link to the article being discussed in this thread:

https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/276694/is-the-womens-march-melting-down

The lead article on the page linked above is a discussion of antisemitism and a prof at one of the City University of NY branches.

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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 04:50 PM

7. Link fixed!

Sorry, all! Had too many tabs open and linked the wrong article.

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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Tue Dec 11, 2018, 05:59 PM

11. Well on the bright side

I guess everyone can be united in hatred of Jewish people.

(Yes, bitter sarcasm.)

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Response to EllieBC (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 06:24 AM

16. Fuck yes it is!

Women’s March leaders hurt the cause by tolerating anti-Semitism

I was one of the founding organizers of the Women’s March on Raleigh (2017) and the Women’s Raleigh on Rally (2018), and I am Jewish. Our ad hoc group of over 200 volunteers is not affiliated with the National Women’s March. We organized in solidarity. I join Teresa Shook (whose Facebook post is credited with the idea for the Women’s March) in calling on the board of the National Women’s March to step down, including Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour, Carmen Perez, and Bob Bland. Their acts and omissions with relationship to anti-Semitism distract from the Women’s March and its allies, and cause harm.

Anti-Semitism is on the rise. At the 2017 Unite the Right march in Charlottesville, the crowd chanted “Jews will not replace us!” as they marched past a synagogue. In October 2018, a self-described conservative and white nationalist killed 11 worshipers at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. Last month, a prom photo of a Wisconsin high school apparently doing the Seig Heil went viral. Jews are being targeted locally, as well: this summer and again this the fall, threats were sent to Triangle area temples.

We cannot equivocate in the face of anti-Semitism and violence. We cannot be silent. We cannot give a pass to an elder for inciting anti-Semitism because he has done other great things. Each member of the board of the National Women’s March has done one or more of these things and in so doing has contributed to allowing anti-Semitism to fester within the women’s movement.

Board Members Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour and Carmen Perez have attended rallies led by Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam leader. While Farrakhan has done great works, he also foments hate and discrimination against multiple communities at his rallies. Regarding Jews, he has compared us to termites, called us bloodsuckers, and exalted Hitler as a ”very great man.”

more...

Washington Women’s March group disbands amid anti-Semitism controversy at national level

Statewide organizers operating under the Women’s March banner announced this week that they are dissolving their group in protest of national leaders’ association with speakers seen as anti-Semitic.

The decision won’t affect plans for a third annual downtown march in Spokane next month, local organizers stressed Friday.

Angie Beem, a Spokane Valley resident who served as board president of Women’s March Washington, announced the dissolution of the state group on Facebook on Thursday, citing the national organization’s ties to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. Beem, who helped organize the march in Spokane in 2017 and made an unsuccessful bid for Spokane Valley City Council that fall, said in an interview Friday the decision to disband wasn’t easy.

“It’s heartbreaking. Whenever you create something that literally changed your life, it’s really hard to walk away from it,” Beem said.

Local organizers knew the state organization was considering disbanding after planned marches in January, said Lori Feagan, an organizer with Spokane Women’s March. But they were unaware a public announcement would be made this week, she said.

“We are independent,” Feagan said. “We don’t have any financial backing (from) the state or national organization.”

more...

Women’s March rolls out political platform before its third Washington rally

For two years, the Women’s March has cultivated an image: fiery protests, rallies, sit-ins, arrests and women taking to the streets en masse with catchy slogans, chants and songs.

But a month before its rally on the Mall, the group has announced a change in course.

At the Jan. 19 march, the organization plans to unveil a federal policy platform it is calling “the Women’s Agenda” that will outline a 10-prong call to action for lawmakers. The agenda will pinpoint “realistically achievable” priorities, such as raising the federal minimum wage, addressing violence against women and reproductive rights and passing the long-dormant Equal Rights Amendment, officials said.

“Once we have this platform, we intend to organize around it, to mobilize around it and . . . we will consider it to be marching orders from our movement,” said Rachel O’Leary Carmona, chief operating officer of Women’s March Inc. “And we will bring about swift political consequences to those who oppose us.”

The focus on creating an actionable doctrine comes as the organization is trying to ramp up support for its march amid accusations of anti-Semitism and ongoing controversies surrounding Women’s March leaders’ ties to the Nation of Islam and its leader, Louis Farrakhan.

more...

It isn't just the fucking anti-Semitism, it is also the homophobia and transphobia! Get rid of those assholes....NOW! Pun, intended. Of course, we all know, anti-Semitism is A-OK.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Reply #16)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 01:42 PM

17. I can't believe no one has pointed out to Mallory

that Farrakhan is a huge misogynist. Did she miss that part???

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