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Sat Apr 6, 2019, 07:41 PM

a message of hope and possibility for the obese

i was an overweight child. you know, when your mom takes you to get new school clothes and you have to go with "husky". i was slow of foot, and not very athletic until i hit puberty when things kind of evened out a bit, but as you may guess that didn't last.

from the time i was in my mid-20s until now (late-40s) i watched the pounds pile on and my health slide away, as i worked at increasingly stressful tech industry jobs. i had bouts with depression and anxiety, and 7 years ago i was diagnosed with MS. exercising became difficult and dangerous, due to being obese and extra-clumsy. eventually, after breaking a toe in the showers at the health club, i gave up on it. but the pounds kept coming. there was nothing i could do. i despaired and just kind of accepted that i was on the express train to heart disease and all i could do was wait for the inevitable death blow.

then something interesting happened. one of my favorite film directors, the formerly obese Kevin Smith, had a heart attack and was away from his webcasts for a while. when he returned, he was thin -- well not exactly thin, but on the upper edge of normal. he talked about what he did during recovery. basically he got in touch with Penn Jillette who had lost a lot of weight and referred him to the diet i'm using now. before+after pic:

quick excerpt from an extended interview about his diet:


the general idea is quite simple: avoid "dense" foods - foods that pack a lot of nutrients into a small package. these are things like meats, dairy, refined sugars, and oils. in particular, eat plants as much as possible.

for the first week (or few days, however long it takes to get your body to understand) of the diet, only eat potatoes. you can bake them or air-fry them however you like, but no oils or salts. important: you can have as much food as you like, as long as it is a potato. you will quickly discover that many of the ideas you previously had about potatoes were based mostly in the oils and salts required by society for "civilized" dining. eventually when you have a hunger attack you may ask yourself "yes i'm hungry, but am i potato hungry?"

for the second week, you can add corn to your potato diet. after a week of eating potatoes, you will be surprised at how sweet corn actually is.

keep going along like this for a while - every week add another plant or two until you are getting an enjoyable variety of flavors from your meals in addition to the fullness. jalapenos are fantastic - i'd definitely put them in the top 5 foods to add, but proceed in a way that works for you.

as this progresses, also be mindful of the food messaging you receive from the ambient culture (which food is advertised where, how is it presented and who is the target audience). i found the messaging to be significant, dangerous, and causal. being aware of such things can help you down the road. remember, your previous diet got you as far as it did, you can damn well try this for a couple months.

after almost 3 months on this diet of plant-based eating, i have lost 45 pounds. my eczema (which formerly covered my legs, arms, and shoulders with small itchy bumps) has completely disappeared. my hair, which was falling out in an unpleasant way, is growing back in with a lot less grey. most importantly, i have no desire to return to the Standard American Diet. my energy levels remain high, and i walk a lot faster now that 20% of my body weight is ... just gone. the great bonus of this approach to eating is its inherent simplicity - you already know what you can eat, you don't need to track points, and after a couple weeks you might not have any urges to deviate anyway. don't get alarmed about the nutrients - there are plants that give you iron and calcium and selenium and all that good stuff nutritionists will tell you aren't available on a vegan diet. we now live in a society where it is possible to research and acquire excellent plant-based nutrition, it would be a shame if we don't make use of these abilities.

yes, i still have a way to go - about 30-40 pounds before i'm where i want to be. but here's the difference: now i have hope where before there was resignation and despair. i'm sharing this because as one of the many millions of Americans dealing with our own personal tribulations in the mass-obesity epidemic, i found a way back from the danger zone, and it would be downright selfish and irresponsible for me to not pass it on.

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Arrow 48 replies Author Time Post
Reply a message of hope and possibility for the obese (Original post)
0rganism Apr 2019 OP
sinkingfeeling Apr 2019 #1
0rganism Apr 2019 #19
The Blue Flower Apr 2019 #2
ProudMNDemocrat Apr 2019 #4
0rganism Apr 2019 #7
SCantiGOP Apr 2019 #14
Honeycombe8 Apr 2019 #15
ProudMNDemocrat Apr 2019 #27
snort Apr 2019 #13
0rganism Apr 2019 #18
ProudMNDemocrat Apr 2019 #29
clarkd101 Aug 2020 #47
ProudMNDemocrat Apr 2019 #3
0rganism Apr 2019 #8
ProudMNDemocrat Apr 2019 #26
eShirl Apr 2019 #11
badhair77 Apr 2019 #5
0rganism Apr 2019 #21
True Dough Apr 2019 #30
happybird Apr 2019 #33
True Dough Apr 2019 #37
happybird Apr 2019 #38
True Dough Apr 2019 #40
Lunabell Apr 2019 #6
0rganism Apr 2019 #9
Lunabell Apr 2019 #22
JackInGreen Apr 2019 #12
Honeycombe8 Apr 2019 #17
Nay Apr 2019 #25
True Dough Apr 2019 #31
happybird Apr 2019 #32
fierywoman Apr 2019 #10
0rganism Apr 2019 #20
fierywoman Apr 2019 #23
iluvtennis Apr 2019 #16
patricia92243 Apr 2019 #24
samnsara Apr 2019 #28
0rganism Apr 2019 #35
OhZone Apr 2019 #34
0rganism Apr 2019 #36
Mendocino Apr 2019 #39
artislife Apr 2019 #41
0rganism Apr 2019 #42
artislife Apr 2019 #43
0rganism Apr 2019 #44
artislife Apr 2019 #45
0rganism Apr 2019 #46
clarkd101 Aug 2020 #48

Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 07:53 PM

1. interesting. Does this diet have a name or any more details?

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #1)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 11:13 PM

19. i've seen it referred to as the "potato reset diet" but that overemphasizes the beginning imho

my wife calls it "whole-food plant-based S.O.S. free"

you can use rice instead of potatoes if, say, you're allergic to spuds, but the same rules apply -- no salt, no refined sugar, no added oils.

the details may vary by taste and dedication, but as long as you're just eating unprocessed plants you're going to be doing it right.

it is simplicity itself. no calorie counting, no menu matching, no fancy shakes, no need to get meals delivered for a monthly fee. just eat plants. you win.

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 07:54 PM

2. What would a potato diet do to blood sugar?

I'd be happy to live on potatoes, beans, and corn, but I'm diabetic.

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #2)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 08:01 PM

4. My husband is a Type II diabetic.....

Who also has a heart issue.

I prepare meals rich in lean Protein, low carb, good fats and oils, no salt, no sugar, leafy greens aND a variety of vegetables. He adjusts his insulin based on the amount of carbs he eats at a meal.

I am a Lifetime member of Weight Watchers, so I adjust things to feed him well and keep him healthy.

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Response to ProudMNDemocrat (Reply #4)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 08:46 PM

7. this diet is reported to reverse type II diabetes

not mitigate. not slow. reverse.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #7)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 10:18 PM

14. I can attest that your statement is correct

I have a friend who is a nurse who works for an endocrinologist, which is the doctor that treats Type 1 and 2 diabetics. She said they have had dozens of Type 2 patients who were in pretty bad shape and using insulin daily who were able to achieve normal blood glucose levels through diet and exercise. It can be done, but itís not easy, and not possible for some.

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Response to ProudMNDemocrat (Reply #4)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 10:33 PM

15. That sounds like a life long healthy eating plan to me.

Weight Watchers has a very healthy eating plan to lose weight, IMO.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #15)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 11:18 AM

27. Exactly.....

Weight Watchers is NOT a diet, but a Lifestyle that is flexible and doable. They provide the tools, we have to do the work. We have to hold ourselves accountable. Our bodies are one gigantic Science Laboratory we need to take care of properly in order for it to function and produce results.


Many people lose weight for an event like a Wedding or Class Reunion. Why not make it for LIFE?

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #2)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 10:08 PM

13. I reversed and got rid of the diabetes type 2 about 15 years ago.

It isn't fun: I went vegetarian, ate about 1000 cals or less per day and engaged in near manic levels of aerobic exercise while hungry. Went from 350+ to 185. Diabetes gone.

I don't think the vegetarianism really had anything to do with my success, I'd say it was the exercise while being in the "holy shit I'm hungry" mode. Not pleasant but you do get used to it. As a bonus, when you do eat, it not only tastes like a million dollar meal but there is a level of satisfaction from inside ones body that was missing.

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #2)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 10:59 PM

18. carbs get a bad rap while it's the fats that are killing us

Last edited Sat Apr 6, 2019, 11:43 PM - Edit history (2)

meanwhile, having a single serving of processed meat each day bumps your risk of diabetes up by something like 35%
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170905134506.htm
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/how-to-reduce-your-risk-of-diabetes-cut-back-on-meat/

that said, if i had diabetes and wanted to try this diet, i'd probably take it day by day just in case.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #18)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 11:29 AM

29. Fats are not the enemy if we know which ones are the BAD......

Such as hardened fat on cuts of Beef, Pork, Lamb, Bacon. By trimming these meats to have some fat for flavor, in moderation is fine. Too lean, the meat is stringy and lacks flavor. Fowl meats and Fish are excellent sources of lean Protein. The fats they produce keep them warm. Still I trim fat from Chicken, Turkey, and Duck.

Oils in 1 Tablespoon amounts as indicated on the labels, is good. Butter in 1 teaspoon amounts, not exceeding 2 in a serving.

Carbs get a lot of people in trouble. Carbs in the forms of added Sugars, especially. Sugar is in everything. As is Salt. Eating too much breads, Pastas, Potatoes, Cereals, Rice, raises Blood Sugar levels and can cause drastic crashes, which can result in Diabetic comas and possible seizures. . Eating these carbs in measured amounts in moderation have benefits. Refined flours are bad. Whole wheat, Soy, Almond flours can be used in many recipes that are even Keto friendly.

The body needs certain carbs in low Glycemic Fruits and Vegetables. Nuts add additional nutrition such as Walnuts, Almonds, peanuts that are low in bad fat, high in the good.

Creating a balance is healthy for life. That is the challenge.

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #2)

Sat Aug 29, 2020, 09:58 AM

47. Avoid Potatoes

 

I suggest to avoid potatoes as potatoes contain carbohydrates that are harmful for diabetic patients.

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 07:57 PM

3. Don't eliminate healthy Fats and Oils.....

Your Central Nervous system and Brain need them to function properly. Know what Fats and oils are good for you like Extra Virgin, Avocado, Coconut (in moderation), Safflower. Do watch fat on cuts of beef, lamb, pork, chicken.

Oils in Fresh water wild caught fish like Salmon, are rich in the Heart Healthy Omega 3. Fish caught in very cold waters have higher fat content in order to stay warm. Same for the indigenous peoples of Alaska who have very low instances of heart disease because the fat they eat from walrus and seals are high in Omega 3s.

Get to know your fats and Oils.

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Response to ProudMNDemocrat (Reply #3)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 08:53 PM

8. indeed. but ask yourself, what is a healthy amount?

how much of these fats and oils do you really need? one of the primary pit-falls of vegan diets is overuse of vegetable oils. such foods are very dense. how many avocados go into making a tablespoon of avocado oil? what would happen if you simply ate an avocado or two instead?

so maybe try not having extracted & refined oils for a few weeks. i guarantee your central nervous system will not cease operations because of it. then reassess.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #8)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 11:13 AM

26. Excellent points...

When I use Health Oils like Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Safflower, Canola, I use my Tablespoon. 1 to 2 tablespoons for my salad depending on big it is. I love salads with dinner. I eat 1/2 of an Avocado a day.

Proteins are no more than ounces weighed after cooking. Leafy green veggies like Broccoli, Spinach, Green Beans, Eggplant, Peppers, etc. I watch the Glycemic index on them as well as on Rices, Pastas, Potatoes, Breads, etc. that raise Blood Sugar levels.


Getting to know your body and how foods affect it is worth the research. Getting Blood work done and a Physical gives a person much to work with. Weight Watchers is more than just losing weight and keeping it off. It has ventured more into behaviors, looking into the person and how change brings about results as they learn healthier habits that last a lifetime. I see my monthly meetings as therapy to continue on that healthy path.

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Response to ProudMNDemocrat (Reply #3)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 09:09 PM

11. I love walnuts, plus they have ALA Omega 3

olive oil's great too, or just olives

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 08:19 PM

5. Years ago I started eating plain baked potatoes for lunch.

I lost weight without being hungry. I donít know why I strayed from that habit but now Iím thinking I need to revisit that idea. I even cheated on time and used the microwave. I cut them in pieces and put them in a container. Then it took seconds to warm them up. Thanks for posting.

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Response to badhair77 (Reply #5)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 11:35 PM

21. exactly this!

eat plain potatoes, no more hunger, no more cravings. cook them however you like, right? slice them, refrigerate them, and when you have that hunger attack at midnight, just roll them over to the microwave and voila! instant satiation.

one of the trickiest battles was the "satiation" vs. "gratification" aspects of food. this society conditions us to expect entertainment from food -- the two are frequently mixed in some way. so our taste buds are always at goddam Disneyland, and healthy food seems boring by comparison. this is our national eating disorder in action.

now when i eat, i don't plan on being thrilled by my food, it doesn't need to be packed to the brim with the most exciting flavors known to humanity. it's enough that a meal be nourishing and filling.

this diet didn't just get my weight down, it's fixing my eating disorder.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #21)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 11:52 AM

30. I'm not obese

but I'm in my mid-40s and I've put on 12-15 pounds over the past few years, so I'm overweight and my body composition is changing. Part of it is aging but part of it is my eating habits/declining rates of exercise. (I'm now 5'11", 181 pounds, up from 168-ish).

I've read bits and pieces about diets and always find a reason to not give them a try. One of the biggest challenges for me is late-night eating. I'm a night owl and my appetite seems to rev up later in the day (only a minor drive to eat prior to noon). Anyway, most of what I read says NEVER eat after 7 p.m or 8 p.m. so I just shrug and move on.

Yet your regimen allows for late-night eating, as long as it's potatoes so I wouldn't need to go to bed on an empty stomach. Maybe I'll give it a try. I have to get motivated to do something because, as I mentioned, I'm heading for bigger problems (literally) if I don't rein in my current trajectory.

Thanks for sharing this!

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Response to True Dough (Reply #30)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 12:34 PM

33. We sound very similar

Mid 40's, not obese but gained a bit of weight over the last few years, and night owl. My weight gain has been from lack of exercise and my metabolism slowing in my mid 30's (or possibly from the medication I took for the last 11 years, which I am recently off of).

Thankfully, I seem have a max weight because I stopped gaining about 2 years ago without making any changes, but I'd like to drop 20 pounds. This is the biggest I've ever been.

I've always thought the "never eat after 8 pm" rule was aimed at people whose bodies operate on 'normal' circadian rhythms. For me, 8pm is 11pm. It's a couple hours after dinnertime and about 3-4 hours before my body naturally starts to wind down for sleep.



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Response to happybird (Reply #33)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 03:46 PM

37. Yes, I'd say we're sorta kindred spirits

I too had a "max weight."

In university, I worked out like a madman. Lifted some pretty heavy weights and I almost tipped the scale at 200 pounds, most of the gains were muscle mass. Made another concerted effort to bulk up again in my 30s, but never exceeded 185 pounds. In between and most of the time since, I've hovered around 165 to 170 pounds.

But the past year or two has brought a lot more "softness," from being too sedentary and having a sweet tooth. It's resulted in the gradual creeping up to 180 lbs range.

Like you, I usually eat for the last time between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. and it's often a bowl of cereal (sometimes a wheat or oat-based cereal with good fibre content, but sometimes I'll mix in something like Nesquik).

Other than that, I'm married, a dog owner (no kids), born in January, do a lot of writing in my profession. Did I hit upon any other commonalities? We both hate Trump, I'm sure.



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Response to True Dough (Reply #37)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 04:22 PM

38. Ha!

I lifted weights in school (soccer conditioning) and found out that I bulk up like a body builder very quickly. It was kinda scary and I've avoided weights ever since. My sister, a disgustingly healthy and avid exercise buff, won't lift weights for the same reason.
Maybe we missed what the universe was trying to say and should have gone pro?

Otherwise, I hate Dump, am an animal lover (4 cats, we haven't yet had the heart to get another dog since our two passed, they were difficult losses), married, no kids, and cereal lover.

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Response to happybird (Reply #38)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 05:00 PM

40. Yep, definitely lots in common, DU friend

How about Breaking Bad/Better Call Saul. Those are among my favourite TV series (along with The Wire and Sopranos). You?

Movies: Dances with Wolves, Forrest Gump, Good Will Hunting, Shawshank Redemption, The Lives of Others

Music: Coldplay, Collective Soul, Led Zeppelin

Sports: I follow the NFL, MLB and NHL. Also watch quite of bit of the UFC

Oh yeah, and I'm with Pete Buttigieg all the way!

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 08:22 PM

6. I'm glad you feel better

But you're kind of fat shaming.

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Response to Lunabell (Reply #6)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 08:59 PM

9. i'm glad too

so glad that i shared a way out if someone feels trapped in a dangerous malfunctioning body.

fat shaming wasn't my intention.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #9)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 11:58 PM

22. Yes, but some of us fat people already have hope

And positivity. While I'm sure you meant the post to be inspirational, I read it as being condescending and holier than thou. Good luck.

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Response to Lunabell (Reply #6)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 09:51 PM

12. Only today would someone

Saying "I made myself healthier" be read as "you're unhealthy you naughty naughty person"

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Response to JackInGreen (Reply #12)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 10:49 PM

17. +1. nt

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Response to JackInGreen (Reply #12)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 11:09 AM

25. +1.

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Response to JackInGreen (Reply #12)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 11:57 AM

31. I agree

Never thought of the OP or this thread as being boastful. If anything, it's the opposite. The sharing of an idea that could benefit others tremendously.

"Organism" doesn't state that his/her method is the ONLY way, just that it's worked for him and it could work for others. I'm grateful he/she was eager to put it out there for the rest of us.

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Response to JackInGreen (Reply #12)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 12:06 PM

32. +1

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 09:03 PM

10. Penn Jillette's book is a fun read. If you want more info on veganism and diabetes, read

Joel Fuhrman.

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Response to fierywoman (Reply #10)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 11:18 PM

20. i've been using a "Plant-Based Nutrition" guide by Hever and Cronise, seems to work okay

still haven't read Penn's "Presto" but it's on my short list...

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #20)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 12:43 AM

23. BTW, congrats!

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Apr 6, 2019, 10:36 PM

16. Take it one day at a time. sending up some good karma for you.

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 03:52 AM

24. Thanks for posting the simplified version of Gillette 's book. I tried to read it but find him so

irritating that I couldn't finish it. I wanted to know about the diet and he rattled on and on about everything else. I got about half way through it and will try to plow through the rest, thanks to your helpful post.

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 11:18 AM

28. Your weight loss is great!!! But my body would turn all those spuds into fat..

..but it sounds yummy.

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Response to samnsara (Reply #28)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 01:37 PM

35. your body has to work pretty hard to turn whole plants into fat

(remember - no added sugar, oils or salts)

and i won't lie to you - it's not yummy at all. not at first anyway. later on when you can add plants to bump up the flavors, it can be tasty, but at first it's pretty dull. which is fine - it's dull, not gross. eating dull food slowly (which you will) gives you time to contemplate the process of eating and how it feels to fill your stomach. and this is another part of the up-side: your stomach will be completely full after the meals, you will be completely fed, and you can then move on to do other stuff and not think about food again for many hours.

having overstimulated taste buds is part of our culturally inherited eating disorder. one of the benefits of the diet is it teaches eating for satiation rather than entertainment.

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 01:02 PM

34. I'm happy for him, but -

low carb is what keeps me a skinny bitch.

That and a lot of working out.

And - um. Other stuff. Guess I could file that under working out. ha

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Response to OhZone (Reply #34)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 01:43 PM

36. for those of us who have difficulty exercising, we need another path

as for the "other stuff", due to MS, that hasn't been an option for me for a couple years now.

i'm glad it's working for you, though.

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sun Apr 7, 2019, 04:23 PM

39. Good for you!

I'm vegan and would never return to any other lifestyle. They are some good resources; doctors Michael Greger, Neal Barnard, Kristi Funk, Garth Davis and Caldwell Esselstyn. I like some of the lifestyle gurus like Mike the Vegan, Those Annoying Vegans and Happy Healthy Vegan.

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sun Apr 21, 2019, 10:00 PM

41. Just about to start a 6 week closed group

 

that is based around this book

www.amazon.com/Pleasure-Trap-Mastering-Undermines-Happiness/dp/1570671974


Last year, my brother came to visit and he has two kidneys functioning at less than 35% and he said he didn't want to go on dialysis when the time comes.

I stopped looking for diets to lose weight and looked for diets to get healthy. I would like to donate if he needs a kidney and I haven't eaten well for the most part.

I did come to the plant based movement and I have made the switch. But you don't have to go all in, it just makes it easier for me because the environment is huge for me.

The fact that I decrease my carbon foot print by a great number is what helps me stay on course. Because ham and cheese paninos are my favorite food.

What has changed is inflammation in my hands, knees and other parts of my body. My gut feels light.

I think Big Food creates our cravings and disrupts our health. I want to know how to not rely on will power but choice.

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Response to artislife (Reply #41)

Mon Apr 22, 2019, 04:31 PM

42. "how to not rely on will power but choice"

that is the most important change i felt after a few weeks on the diet

imho, you're absolutely right about "Big Food" as you call it. i feel like we've all been played for fools as our society promoted and pushed a fundamentally unhealthy - but profitable - lifestyle on us. as a result, the vast majority of us have built-in eating disorders.

i found this to be a handy thought/real experiment: suppose i'm hungry and before me there is a simple bowl of salad large enough for a full meal that i could eat. by salad, i mean just chopped up plants, perfectly ripe and wholesome, no dressings or whatnot. and i consider eating this salad for dinner. the inner dialog i have with respect to reasons why not to eat such a meal is like having a direct phone conversation with my eating disorder.

conversely, flip it around. in addition to the salad, consider a plate of your favorite food right there next to it. a cheeseburger, a pizza , a ham and cheese panino, whatever. the inner dialog pushing you to eat the non-salad rather than the salad is also the eating disorder in action.

we did not evolve to eat such dense animal-based food, yet it is presented as part of a completely normal diet by our society. bodies do not function like that. you can't just roll with "henceforth, i will eat only tree bark" and expect to maintain health. you have to eat the food we evolved to eat. would you demand that your housecat eat cabbage? no? then why require yourself to eat things that are neither filling nor nutritious? that's our cultural eating disorder in action.

i think the first step for me to overcome it was eating plants to the point of fullness. the potato is an easy starting point -- i challenge you to eat more than 2 potatoes (remember, no additives, just the cooked potato, skin and all) at a sitting. eat potatoes until your stomach is absolutely full. after you are no longer hungry you'll be in a prime position to choose what you eat. you will get beyond a point of needing will power for this, as you will no longer crave additional food to fill the gaps in your stomach.

and beyond that point lies a whole new world of choice. you'll see the food for what it is, and you can decide for yourself. i found it to be incredibly easy once i got past the hunger element -- actually, once i removed my instinctive cravings from the food selection process, the rest fell into place almost immediately. when viewing the food dispassionately, it becomes transparently obvious which food is natural for our species' consumption vs. that which is only established as a dietary norm through extensive cultural conditioning.

that said, i would also observe that for all the shortcomings of the food supply and the associated cultural norms, it has never been easier to acquire a large quantity of healthy plant-based foods. i have never felt more full for longer after a meal.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #42)

Mon Apr 22, 2019, 04:37 PM

43. I think we are on the same page

 

I am trying to follow an sos free plant based diet. It's the salt and potato chips that I have a problem with. I am in a three week slide but my webinar 1 starts this evening. I am sure I can do this.

I tried brown rice instead of potatoes because I find I can eat it like oatmeal in the morning. I lasted about a week and a half and tried to cut out flour as well. It created the biggest cravings. I was practically Vegan for almost a year and I blew it, and then started getting deep fried spicy chicken burgers from Wendy's. I am trying to reign it all back in, but the mind keeps saying.."tomorrow, tomorrow" Well, I paid for this 6 week course, it should help me stick to following and doing the work.


Glad I found a like minded person.

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Response to artislife (Reply #43)

Mon Apr 22, 2019, 05:00 PM

44. food density -- a big part of my success on the diet is just avoiding dense foods

there's a lot of "vegan junk food" out there -- dense, salty food that provides minimal nutrition and doesn't fill you up, but it doesn't have animal bits so it gets called "vegan".

flour is a dense food. it had to go. all of it. sorry.

unfortunately, i think it's the same way with the morning rice -- i tried out a rice porridge as an oatmeal alternative and found i was eating roughly twice as much to get the same fullness i would have with normal oatmeal. not recommended.

now i'm kind of thinking maybe one needs to spend enough time in the potatoes-only stage to recognize the eating disorder consciously. i was lucky - got my lesson in a few days.

did you try eating potatoes until you were quite full?

anyway, you're going to be working with pros for 6 weeks, i think you're well-positioned to succeed.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #44)

Mon Apr 22, 2019, 05:01 PM

45. I have an air fryer

 

so I should go with the potatoes.

Thanks for the encouragement!

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Response to artislife (Reply #45)

Mon Apr 22, 2019, 05:13 PM

46. air fryers are absolutely a cause for celebration

ability to change up how you prep the food definitely helps with not getting too bored.

you're right at the doorway to a huge forward step in health. here's to walking through unhindered!

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Response to 0rganism (Original post)

Sat Aug 29, 2020, 10:10 AM

48. True Motivation. Good job

 

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