HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » scarletwoman » Journal
Page: 1

scarletwoman

Profile Information

Gender: Female
Hometown: Minnesota
Current location: up north
Member since: 2001
Number of posts: 30,688

About Me

I'm a 70 year old white woman, born in November, 1949. My parents lived through the Depression and WWII (my dad's a veteran). I've witnessed a lot of history firsthand, plus I carry the stories handed down to me by my parents, aunts and uncles from their generation, and my grandparents from their generation. Basically, my memory is a depository for most of the 20th century of U.S. history, plus the 2 decades (so far) of the 21st century.

Journal Archives

In the interest of accuracy, let's be clear that there were only two short periods in 2009-2010

in which Democrats, and the 2 Independents who caucused with them, held 60 seats:

http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/did-the-democrats-ever-really-have-60-votes-in-the-senate-and-for-how-long/

Did The Democrats Ever Really Have 60 Votes In The Senate, And For How Long?

Doug Mataconis ∑ Sunday, June 17, 2012

<snip>

Of course, as we all know too well, having majority control of both house of Congress doesnít necessarily mean much if the opposition in the Senate decides to filibuster your legislation, and without a consistent caucus of 60 votes to overcome a cloture vote, legislation can be effectively blocked.

That leads to the question of how long the Democrats actually had a filibuster proof majority in the 111th Congress. As this chart from Wikipedia reveals, it wasnít for a very long period of time at all: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/111th_United_States_Congress#Senate

What this shows is is that there were only two time periods during the 111th Congress when the Democrats had a 60 seat majority:
■From July 7. 2009 (when Al Franken was officially seated as the Senator from Minnesota after the last of Norm Colemanís challenges came to an end) to August 25, 2009 (when Ted Kennedy died, although Kennedyís illness had kept him from voting for several weeks before that date at least); and
■From September 25, 2009 (when Paul Kirk was appointed to replace Kennedy) to February 4, 2010 (when Scott Brown took office after defeating Martha Coakley);
■For one day in September 2009, Republicans lacked 40 votes due to the resignation of Mel Martinez, who was replaced the next day by George LeMieux


So, to the extent there was a filibuster proof majority in the Senate it lasted during two brief periods which lasted for a total of just over five months when counted altogether (and Congress was in its traditional summer recess for most of the July-August 2009 time frame).


Also remember that one of those two Independents who caucused with the Democrats was Joe Lieberman, who went his own way when it suited him and could not be relied on.
Go to Page: 1