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Judi Lynn

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Member since: 2002
Number of posts: 149,822

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Sami people ask Danish queen to return sacred witchcraft trial drum

Norwegian indigenous minority seek permanent ownership of artefact seized after 17th-century trial

Helen Russell in Jutland
Wed 13 Oct 2021 05.23 EDT



A Sámi drum from the British Museum in London. Most of the few remaining drums are in European hands. Photograph: Trustees of the British Museum

Norway’s Sámi people are asking for a sacred drum confiscated by Denmark after a witchcraft trial in 1691 to be returned to them permanently, and they have asked the Danish queen for help.

The drum belonged to a Sámi shaman, Anders Poulsson, who was arrested and imprisoned, according to court records. It was confiscated and became part of the Danish royal family’s art collection before being transferred to Denmark’s National Museum in 1849.

Since 1979, the drum has been on loan from the Danes to the Sámi museum in Karasjok, Norway. The loan agreement expires on 1 December and the drum is expected to return to Denmark. But the Sámi people want it back.

The Sámi Museum in Karasjok sent a request to the Danish National Museum earlier this year to formally take over ownership of the drum and the president of the Sámi parliament, Aili Keskitalo, has issued a statement to Norwegian and Danish press demanding the drum’s return.

More:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/oct/13/sami-people-norway-ask-danish-queen-to-return-sacred-witchcraft-trial-drum

~ ~ ~









(very old photo, colorized)

You may appreciate taking a moment to note the unique folk clothing, etc., of the Sámi people, Norway's (and Sweden's) native population:

https://tinyurl.com/64hwts5j

Wikipedia information regarding the Sámi:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1mi_people

~ ~ ~

Sweden’s Troubled Relationship With The Indigenous Sámi Community
January 21, 2021 Pallavi Chatterjee
THE INDIGENOUS SÁMI COMMUNITY

Upon hearing the term “indigenous community”, one might not be blamed for thinking perhaps of the supremely well-organized and politically active Latin American tribes, or perhaps First Nations communities from Northern America who have long-standing histories of formally organizing and agitating for their fundamental rights and freedoms. Their adversaries are represented in stark terms – the unrestrained capitalist bent of their national political and economic institutions, entrenched discrimination and histories of violence, mistreatment, and disenfranchisement persisting till today.

The nomadic Sámi communities of northernmost Sweden, Norway, Finland and parts of Russia are seldom thought of in this regard. Historically referred to as “Lapps” or “Lapplanders”, Sámi historical territories (referred to as “Sápmi”)span a vast geographic region home to a variety of wildlife and extensive natural resources, where they engage primarily in reindeer-herding, fur trapping, and fishing as their sources of livelihood. The looming threat of climate change directly and disproportionately impacts their livelihoods, cultural practices and very survival itself.

The Scandinavian states are particularly well-regarded for being champions of progressive climate change actions, and are universally renowned for their relatively free and equal societies, low levels of inequality, and the reliable and well-demonstrated distributive benefits of their social democratic political and economic systems. What is less known is the legacy of aggressive forced assimilation in the name of sovereignty between southern-dwelling Scandinavians and northern-dwelling Sámi populations throughout the 1800s – alarmingly similar to the treatment faced by First Nations tribes. What is even less acknowledged is the deleterious impact of present-day environmental projectsconducted within Sápmi territories in the name of “fighting climate change”.

While evaluating any institution for the efficacy of its actions on a holistic scale, however, it is always the voices of its most marginalized and its most vulnerable populations that provide the inconvenient truths that must also be included within such claims.

. . .

HISTORICAL INJUSTICESAND LEGACIES OF DISCRIMINATION AND ABUSE
Indigenous communities are particularly vulnerable to repressive state actions when claims of land use and property rights are brought to the fore, since such claims ostensibly oppose goals of national development. The Inter-American Court of Human Rights has been a staunch defender of the rights of a number of Latin American indigenous communities, ruling in their favour when states proceeded with large-scale industrial projects on their lands without their consent. An emerging concept within international law pertains specifically to the “special relationship”indigenous communities have with their lands, which must be respected by states and the pretext to which consultations with local stakeholders must be conducted in good faith before the initiation of any projects on their lands which might have an impact on their lives and livelihoods.

Centuries of well-documented discrimination, abuse, and mistreatment of Sámi populations exist, and remains scarcely acknowledged on a global scale. The UN Racial Discrimination Committee (2011) has issued a number of recommendations to Norway and Sweden, criticizing their policies of forcibly assimilating Sámi populations and condemning language as a basis for discrimination. "Swedification" policies of the 1800s persisted well into the 1970s, based on the premise of Sámi populations being “backwards” and “uncivilized”, resulting in forced Christianisation, segregated schooling, banning the use of local languages, and “encouraging” civilized norms – often through force. 17th century Sámi who refused to give up their traditional beliefs in favour of Christianity were threatened with fines, imprisonment and even the death penalty.

More:
https://www.humanrightspulse.com/mastercontentblog/swedens-troubled-relationship-with-the-indigenous-smi-community

Scientists Gain Insights into the Ecology of Brazilian Fishing Jaguars

By Precious Smith Oct 18, 2021 07:10 PM EDT

Researchers from Oregon State University and a group of international experts have uncovered new information about a group of Brazilian jaguars' food, population density, and social interactions.



(Photo : Getty Images)

Ecology of Jaguars
Jaguars in a remote marsh area of Brazil eat mostly fish and aquatic reptiles, making them the first jaguar population known to eat just fish and reptiles. Jaguars were also seen playing, fishing, and traveling together thanks to motion-activated video cameras.

According to Charlotte Eriksson, a doctoral student at Oregon State University and head author of the article, the findings contradict popular perception that jaguars are solitary mammals whose social interactions are limited to courtship and territorial battles.

The study was conducted in a seasonally flooded protected region in the northern part of the Brazilian Pantanal, the world's largest freshwater wetland. In these locations, fishing is prohibited. There are no roads or human settlements in the area, and cattle ranching is prohibited as well.

It's a difficult place to work because of the waterlogged condition of the area, as well as the fact that researchers must cover themselves from head to toe owing to an abundance of biting insects.

. . .




More:
https://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/47879/20211018/scientists-gain-insights-ecology-brazilian-fishing-jaguars.htm


Brazil's Pantanal.























(Around 30 minutes)

~ ~ ~

Brazil Is Burning—and President Bolsonaro’s ‘Terminator’ Environment Minister Is Rolling Back More Protections



An aerial view in Pocone, Brazil, of smoke rising during a fire in the Pantanal wetlands on Sept. 24, 2020.
Buda Mendes—Getty Images

BY CIARA NUGENT
OCTOBER 1, 2020 3:57 PM EDT

Letícia Larcher has had a tough year. As technical coordinator at a conservation institute in western Brazil’s vast Pantanal wetlands, Larcher has spent 2020 dealing with a record spate of wildfires which have destroyed a staggering 22% of the Pantanal—an area about 12 times the size of Rhode Island packed with rare wildlife including jaguars and macaws. She’s also watched another devastating fire season tear through Brazil’s share of the Amazon rainforest, the worst in a decade.

And to cap it all, on Monday, Brazilian environment minister Ricardo Salles added another of the country’s unique landscapes to Larcher’s list of concern. Salles announced an end to two legal protections for mangroves and coastal restinga forests, arguing the protections were “excessively restrictive” and “stifled economic development.”

His decision was quickly suspended by a federal court, after a lawsuit was filed arguing it violates Brazilians’ constitutional right to an ecologically balanced environment. Still, the move opened a new battle ground in one of the most bitterly-fought wars raging in Brazil under far-right President Jair Bolsonaro.

“It’s very frustrating,” Larcher says, noting that she studied mangroves and restinga forests for her doctorate before joining conservation efforts in the Pantanal. Both consist of shrubby, hardy plants that scientists consider vital to protecting land from coastal erosion, sheltering biodiversity and sequestering carbon from the atmosphere to slow the greenhouse effect. ”Salles is the environment minister: his role is to take decisions for the environment, not for other groups.”

It’s not exactly unexpected from Salles, who is nicknamed ‘The Terminator’ among Brazilian climate activists. Appointed by Bolsonaro in December 2018, the 45-year-old has led a decisive campaign to overhaul Brazil’s environmental institutions and relax regulations.

More:
https://time.com/5895167/brazil-fires-ricardo-salles-environment/

Court finds Colombia responsible for rape and torture of journalist Jineth Bedoya


A court has found that the Colombian state bears responsibility for the kidnap, rape and torture of journalist Jineth Bedoya by right-wing paramilitaries in 2000.

Agence France-Presse
San Jose
October 19, 2021UPDATED: October 19, 2021 08:02 IST

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights on Monday ruled that the state of Colombia bears "responsibility" for the ordeal of a female journalist who was kidnapped, raped and then tortured in 2000 by paramilitaries.

. . .

She was investigating a weapons smuggling ring at the prison when she was abducted.

At the court hearing, she implicated agents of the state, in particular an "influential" general of the police force.

The acts "could not have be carried out without the consent and collaboration of the State, or at least with its tolerance," the Court ruled on Monday.

More:
https://www.indiatoday.in/world/story/jineth-bedoya-court-finds-colombia-responsible-for-rape-torture-1866375-2021-10-19

Reintegration of Colombia's former guerrillas threatened: UN


by Adriaan Alsema October 15, 2021

The reintegration of demobilized FARC guerrillas is being threatened by ongoing violence and the failure of Colombia’s government to provide farmland, the United Nations said Thursday.

Speaking before the UN Security Council, mission chief Carlos Ruiz urged the government of President Ivan Duque to fully implement the 2016 peace deal.

The government’s selective implementation is “insufficient to deactivate the factors that underpinned decades of armed conflict and to achieve the Agreement’s transformative potential,” said Ruiz.

The UN chief stressed that attacks on former FARC fighters and failures to implement the peace deal are threatening the reintegration of the 13,000 former guerrillas who are taking part in the peace process.

More:
https://colombiareports.com/reintegration-of-colombias-former-guerrillas-threatened-un/

~ ~ ~

Such a tragically familiar story, extending generations into the past, as previous dissidents, or suspected dissidents, or supporters of human rights are repeatedly assassinated while trying to live in peace, assassinated by death squads operating at the direction of right-wing politicians, or military officials. The members of some paramilitary groups (death squads) are often previous military people.)

A Monumental Portrait of NASA Astronaut Stephanie Wilson Crops Up in Atlanta

OCTOBER 11, 2021

The earthwork is the latest in land artist Stan Herd’s impressive, decades-spanning portfolio



Stretching 4,800 square feet in size, the piece coincides with the United Nations' International Day of the Girl Child initiative and is also part of World Space Week.

Courtesy of Stan Herd

Jennifer Nalewicki

While most artists measure their artworks in inches, Stan Herd measures his in acres. For the past 40 years, the Kansas-based artist has been using farmland, pastures, grassy fields and any other large swaths of open land as his canvas, creating massive earthworks that are best seen from the sky, including a massive vase of flowers and a 2005 edition of the Kansas state quarter.

Fittingly, for his next creation, which will debut today at Woodruff Park in downtown Atlanta, the 71-year-old crop artist is looking up to the sky for inspiration. Stretching 4,800 square feet in size, the piece coincides with the United Nations' International Day of the Girl Child initiative and is also part of World Space Week, an annual event that celebrates global accomplishments in science and technology. Since this year’s theme is Women in Space, Herd has created a portrait of Stephanie Wilson, a veteran NASA astronaut with three space flights under her belt (she’s also the second African American woman to go into space), and one of 18 astronauts who are a part of Artemis, NASA’s lunar exploration program that is scheduled to send the first woman to the moon in 2024.

Herd, a painter and sculptor by trade who attended the University of Wichita on an art scholarship, admits that making artwork of this magnitude is no easy task. From start to finish, it can take weeks and even months to complete a single piece. To make each earthwork, Herd begins by creating a computer sketch using a grid technique that he says is “similar to the way Michelangelo created the [frescoes] on the Sistine Chapel ceiling,” where each square segment translates to a specific measurement. In the case of the Atlanta artwork, one square inch of the sketch equals 10 actual feet.



Herd calls his 4-acre creation, Young Woman of China, his most important earthwork. The piece was produced in the Yunnan Province over a two-year period with the assistance of his family and hundreds of Chinese engineers, laborers, artists, heavy equipment operators and students. Courtesy of Stan Herd

“The real art happens when I transfer the drawing onto the ground,” says Herd, who will often incorporate found elements such as rocks, mulch and dirt to add dimension to a piece. In a piece he created in 1988 which he dubbed Cola Wars, he even had volunteers dress in red and blue T-shirts to replicate a duo of oversized Coca-Cola and Pepsi cans.

More:
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/a-monumental-portrait-of-nasa-astronaut-stephanie-wilson-crops-up-in-atlanta-180978838/

On Pausing Acknowledgement of Indigenous Land

October 13, 2021

Three anthropologists explain why land acknowledgments and the related welcoming ritual can help erase history.



A portion of a map that erases the borders colonial powers drew, and shows instead the Indigenous territories, treaties and languages of North America. (Native Land Digital, CC BY-SA)

By Elisa J. Sobo,Michael Lambert and Valerie Lambert

Many events these days begin with land acknowledgments: earnest statements acknowledging that activities are taking place, or institutions, businesses and even homes are built, on land previously owned by Indigenous peoples.

And many organizations now call on employees to incorporate such statements not only at events but in email signatures, videos, syllabuses and so on. Organizations provide resources to facilitate these efforts, including pronunciation guides and video examples.

Some land acknowledgments are carefully constructed in partnership with the dispossessed. The Burke Museum at the University of Washington in Seattle describes this process:

“Tribal elders and leaders are the experts and knowledge-bearers who generously shared their perspectives and guidance with the Burke. Through this consultation, we co-created the Burke’s land acknowledgement.”

More:
https://consortiumnews.com/2021/10/13/on-pausing-acknowledgement-of-indigenous-land/

Cathedral City cheese, Anchor butter and Cadbury chocolate 'linked to Amazon deforestation', Greenpe

Cathedral City cheese, Anchor butter and Cadbury chocolate ‘linked to Amazon deforestation’, Greenpeace claims

Dairy in household brands is from farms using animal feed from soya supply chain connected to environmental destruction

Harry Cockburn
Environment Correspondent
2 hours ago



Soya farm field besides the original forest of the Amazon in Brazil

(Getty)

Well known supermarket brands such as Cathedral City Cheddar, Cadbury chocolate, Anchor butter, Country Life butter and Davidstow Cheddar, have been linked to “the destruction of vast tracts of Brazilian forest”, through use of farms which feed cattle soya sold by a controversial supplier.

A group of British farms, which sell their milk to these companies, source some of their animal feed from companies buying Brazilian soya exported by the US grain giant Cargill, the investigation by Greenpeace, ITV and the Bureau for Investigative Journalism claims.

They allegedly uncovered a complex soya supply chain linking British dairy farms to “environmental devastation” thousands of miles away in Brazil’s Amazon and Cerrado regions. Both regions are already at huge risk from further deterioration from fire and deforestation, largely to create more agricultural land.

The Cerrado region, where most of Brazil’s soya is grown, is home to 5 per cent of the world’s plant and animal species, while the Amazon contains 10 per cent of all known species.

More:
https://www.independent.co.uk/climate-change/news/cathedral-city-cadbury-brazil-deforestation-b1938539.html

~ ~ ~

There's another part of Brazil that's dying even faster than the Amazon



9.23.2019

The Amazon is still burning, but it's not the only environmental crisis Brazil is staring down at the moment. Just a few miles south of the rainforest is Brazil's Cerrado region, a massive, bio-diverse eco-region that stretches for more than 200 million hectares, accounting for more than 21 percent of all land in Brazil. The area serves as home to thousands of different species of plants, animals, and insects and serves as a massive carbon sink, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Just like the neighboring Amazon, the Cerrado is being destroyed by deforestation — except it's happening at a much faster rate.

To understand how devastating it would be to lose the Cerrado, it's important to know just how unique the region is. Cerrado is what is called "mosaic" habitat, meaning it is made up of multiple types of habitats. This particular one contains savannahs, grasslands, wetlands and forest. Those eco-regions contain more than 200 types of mammals, 800 species of birds, 120 kinds of reptiles, 150 types of amphibians, 1,200 species of fish, 90 million kinds of insects and more than 11,000 plant species. In total, the area is home to five percent of the planet’s animals and plants. According to World Wide Fund for Nature, the Cerrado is one of the most biologically diverse habitats in the world. It is also a particularly important source of water in the region, serving as the starting point for six of Brazil's 12 major hydrological regions. Water originating from the region also serves as a source of electricity for nine out of 10 Brazilians who get their energy from hydroelectric plants.

All of that should present a self-evident case for why protecting the Cerrado is important. Yet, just three percent of the area is considered to be legally protected. The rest is subject to use for all sorts of agricultural purposes. Since the 1950s, the unique landscape has been subject to massive amounts of deforestation. As much as 50 percent of the land has already been deforested, according to the World Wildlife Fund, and more than 70,000 hectares are disappearing every year. By 2030, it is projected that Cerrado will lose tens of millions of additional acres of its native vegetation. As that land disappears, the species that call it home are put in peril. That is particularly troubling because nearly 5,000 species of animal in the Cerrado are considered endemic, meaning they are native to the region. Pushing them out will result in them migrating to unfamiliar habitats where they may be invasive or struggle to survive. Many of the plant species found in the region have yet to be found anywhere else on earth, and destroying their habitat could mean losing those types of plants for good.




To understand how devastating it would be to lose the Cerrado, it's important to know just how unique the region is. Cerrado is what is called "mosaic" habitat, meaning it is made up of multiple types of habitats. This particular one contains savannahs, grasslands, wetlands and forest. Those eco-regions contain more than 200 types of mammals, 800 species of birds, 120 kinds of reptiles, 150 types of amphibians, 1,200 species of fish, 90 million kinds of insects and more than 11,000 plant species. In total, the area is home to five percent of the planet’s animals and plants. According to World Wide Fund for Nature, the Cerrado is one of the most biologically diverse habitats in the world. It is also a particularly important source of water in the region, serving as the starting point for six of Brazil's 12 major hydrological regions. Water originating from the region also serves as a source of electricity for nine out of 10 Brazilians who get their energy from hydroelectric plants.

All of that should present a self-evident case for why protecting the Cerrado is important. Yet, just three percent of the area is considered to be legally protected. The rest is subject to use for all sorts of agricultural purposes. Since the 1950s, the unique landscape has been subject to massive amounts of deforestation. As much as 50 percent of the land has already been deforested, according to the World Wildlife Fund, and more than 70,000 hectares are disappearing every year. By 2030, it is projected that Cerrado will lose tens of millions of additional acres of its native vegetation. As that land disappears, the species that call it home are put in peril. That is particularly troubling because nearly 5,000 species of animal in the Cerrado are considered endemic, meaning they are native to the region. Pushing them out will result in them migrating to unfamiliar habitats where they may be invasive or struggle to survive. Many of the plant species found in the region have yet to be found anywhere else on earth, and destroying their habitat could mean losing those types of plants for good.



Ostriches are seen at a farm in the Cerrado ecosystem, outskirts of Brasilia, Brazil, . . .

ERALDO PERES/AP/SHUTTERSTOCK

Its destruction also means the loss of a significant carbon storage center. According to the World Wildlife Fund, the Cerrado holds about 118 tons of carbon per acre — the equivalent to how much about 25 standard passenger vehicles emit over the course of one year. Greenpeace recently suggested that Cerrado's remaining vegetation could store up to 13.7 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide. For comparison's sake, global carbon emissions from fossil fuel use were just under 9.8 gigatonnes in 2014. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has warned continued destruction of lands like Cerrado could limit the region's ability to capture carbon, minimizing one of its important purposes in protecting not only the many species that live there, but also the overall wellbeing of the planet.

More:
https://www.mic.com/impact/brazils-cerrado-region-faces-deforestation-endangering-thousands-of-species-18794530

~ ~ ~



Deforestation in the Cerrado

Burger King Linked to a Whopping Million-Plus Acres of Deforestation
Half of Brazil’s savanna is already gone, and big soy has taken over
All photos by Jim Wickens/Ecostorm

By Joanna Nix | Mar 20 2017

You might think soy is just a green, harmless alternative for those trying to steer away from meat and toward a plant-based diet. Not exactly: Three-quarters of the world’s soy is used for animal feed, and about half of it is exported from South America—grown on deforested land that has been cleared away for massive soy fields.

“The soybeans connected to deforestation are making their way to the feed of the chickens, pigs, and cows that people all around the world eat,” says Glenn Hurowitz, CEO of the campaign group Mighty Earth. “Almost every international company that sells meat has some connection to deforestation in their supply chain.”

Enter Burger King.

Using satellite and supply-chain mapping tools, Mighty Earth connected the fast-food giant to a whopping million-plus acres of forest-clearing. In its new report, “The Ultimate Mystery Meat,” the global campaign organization identified two of Burger King’s biggest soy suppliers as the culprits: Cargill, the largest privately owned company in the United States, and Bunge, one of the biggest players in South America.

“The destruction of tropical forests causes something around one-fifth of the world’s total climate pollution, and deforestation also threatens some of the most endangered species in the world,” says Hurowitz.

More:
https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/green-life/burger-king-linked-whopping-million-plus-acres-deforestation

Honduran opposition unites behind candidate for president, in major shift

October 13, 2021
4:50 PM CDT
Last Updated 8 hours ago
Americas

By Gustavo Palencia

2 minute read

TEGUCIGALPA, Oct 13 (Reuters) - The top Honduran opposition parties on Wednesday united behind Xiomara Castro as their candidate for a November presidential election, giving the wife of a leftist former president who was ousted in a coup a stronger chance of ousting the ruling party.

The National Opposition Union (UNO) party backed Castro, 62, wife of former president Manuel Zelaya and candidate for the Liberty and Refoundation (Libre) party for the Nov. 28 race, party representatives said.

Castro, who says she will establish diplomatic relations with China and legalize abortion in some situations, would be Honduras' first woman president.

The alliance shakes up the presidential race and presents a serious challenge to President Juan Orlando Hernandez's National Party, in power since elections after Zelaya was ousted in a bloodless military coup in 2009. Until now, the National Party has been leading in polls.

More:
https://www.reuters.com/world/americas/honduran-opposition-unites-behind-candidate-president-major-shift-2021-10-13/

Very courageous lady, in every sense.

Protecting The Environment Means Protecting Indigenous Peoples, Says Sonia Guajajara

Guajajara promises to keep fighting against the marco temporal' thesis at the Brazils Supreme Court, and to take the indigenous lands rights agenda to COP26

7.oct.2021 13h12

Cristiane Fontes
Marcelo Leite

SÃO PAULO y OXFORD

Sonia Guajajara, 47, leader from the Arariboia Indigenous Land, in Maranhão, has a degree both in Languages and in Nursing, with specialisation in special-needs education. She was one of the leaders involved in the People's Summit at the Rio+20 Conference, as well as the first indigenous person to run for vice-president of Brazil, in 2018. Sonia sits in the Executive Coordination of both APIB (Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil) and ANMIGA (National Articulation of Ancestral Warriors Women).

In this interview with Folha, Sonia Guajajara says that the indigenous people are not going to give up their lands and that they will return to Brasília to pressure Brazil ‘s Supreme Court (STF) on indigenous lands ruling. Apib will also take the issue of demarcation of indigenous territories to COP-26, in Glasgow, in order to gain more support for their cause.

The marco temporal (time framework) thesis to be ruled by the Supreme Court goes beyond the constitutional text and posits that indigenous peoples are only entitled to the lands they physically occupied at the time of the 1988 Federal Constitution— which would ignore the history of expulsions and violence against different peoples. Ruralistas (big landowners, farmers and cattle ranchers) claim that the rule would bring legal uncertainty.

Sonia Guajajara also talks about the possibility of running for elections in 2022, the proximity of the indigenous movement to left-wing parties and about domestic violence. “It is a reality among various peoples, in many territories, and t is growing among the Guarani Kaiowá."

More:
https://www1.folha.uol.com.br/internacional/es/cienciaysalud/2021/10/protecting-the-environment-means-protecting-indigenous-peoples-says-sonia-guajajara.shtml?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsen









CHRIS HEDGES: The Anonymous Executioners of the Corporate State

October 7, 2021

Imprisoning the David to Chevron’s Goliath is the latest outrage by a U.S. judiciary now engineered to favor the interests of capital.



Steven Donziger in a video message to supporters on Sept. 30. (Steve Donziger, Twitter)

By Chris Hedges
ScheerPost.com

Judge Loretta Preska, an adviser to the conservative Federalist Society, to which Chevron is a major donor, sentenced human rights attorney and Chevron nemesis Steven Donziger to six months in prison Friday for misdemeanor contempt of court after he had already spent 787 days under house arrest in New York.

Preska’s caustic outbursts — she said at the sentencing, “It seems that only the proverbial two-by-four between the eyes will instill in him any respect for the law” — capped a judicial farce worthy of the antics of Vasiliy Vasilievich, the presiding judge at the major show trials of the Great Purges in the Soviet Union, and the Nazi judge Roland Freisler who once shouted at a defendant, “You really are a lousy piece of trash!”

Donziger, a graduate of Harvard Law School, has been fighting against polluting American oil companies for nearly three decades on behalf of indigenous communities and peasant farmers in Ecuador.

His only “crime” was winning a $9.5 billion judgment in 2011 against Chevron for thousands of plaintiffs. The oil giant had bought Texaco oil company holdings in Ecuador, inheriting a lawsuit alleging it deliberately discharged 16 billion gallons of toMoxic waste from its oil sites into rivers, groundwater, and farmland. Since the verdict, Chevron has come after him, weaponizing litigation to destroy him economically, professionally and personally.

More:
https://consortiumnews.com/2021/10/07/chris-hedges-the-anonymous-executioners-of-the-corporate-state/
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