Welcome to DU! The truly grassroots left-of-center political community where regular people, not algorithms, drive the discussions and set the standards. Join the community: Create a free account Support DU (and get rid of ads!): Become a Star Member All Forums Issue Forums Culture Forums Alliance Forums Region Forums Support Forums Help & Search

halfulglas

halfulglas's Journal
halfulglas's Journal
August 31, 2022

Ornato retiring right now during probe of stolen government documents.

I can't help wondering what he might have to say if he were forced to tell the truth. During his tenure working for Trump he had to be aware of some of Trump's squirreling documents in boxes and toting these boxes hither and yon on all his trips. Maybe not the same boxes each time, but Trump liked to have some of this "stuff" with him. I wonder if he's suddenly retiring after being visited by the FBI. Are they asking him questions about his role in acquiring them?

I might be wrong but I can't help thinking everybody that close in Trump's circle is dirty.

August 20, 2022

Anybody notice the paid Pharma ads?

I don't mean for specific drugs. I mean the political ones complaining about Congress going to ruin treatment options because they will pick and choose drugs we can have after the new legislation is implemented.

Poppycock. Most of the drugs on the market have already been developed with the help of the government and they have been reaping the profits. Also the ones in the pipeline are developed by small startups with grants from the government. The drug looks good and Big Pharma swoops in and buys it up.

They are a bit afraid they will still make billions, but they will have to negotiate.

August 18, 2022

Happy Birthday, Roberto Clemente. the best right fielder I personally saw play.

The hero of my late teens and early adulthood. Posting this in General Discussion instead of sports because he was so much more than a baseball player.

I say personally saw because there are others who will pick other right fielders of other eras, but the way Clemente played the right field wall in Forbes Field was amazing and his rifle throw from right field stopped many runners from even attempting to score.

August 4, 2022

Turn troll Rand Paul's snark on its head.

I'm not a veteran but for what it's worth, it was suggested I cross post this from General Discussion.

Rambling thoughts after watching senator with squirrel on his head make his nasty comments about why not claim asthma, etc. as service connected because of the number of vets who get asthma by a certain age, blah, blah.

It occurred to me --- YES, treat every veteran who has been honorably discharged in the VA system, whether it's for asthma or a broken foot or brain injury - whatever. Upon discharge he's immediately qualified to enter the VA system. The process right now of undergoing evaluation of whether something is a service related condition can be long, expensive, often frustrating and demeaning to the veteran, and can be an unnecessary expense to the VA system. Let's try a pilot program and see if it doesn't actually save the government money in the long run. One of my 3 brothers who are vets actually died of a service-related condition, so I know it can be expensive. Also we now know for sure that many conditions truly are service connected but do not show up immediately.

This would entail enlarging the VA and getting some more medical personnel but look at it from another perspective. Say the veteran eventually ended up with an ACA policy and that would cost the government something and money being fungible, it's just coming from a different bucket. The thing is, if a vet gets appropriate treatment from the time he is discharged, it is a good bet he would be healthier in the long run having a regular long-term doctor and ancillary personnel knowing if he needs treatment and he would get it. The result should be a better and longer life.

The other point is that the VA is the closest we have to universal health care for those who qualify. Enlarging this cohort who quality through a pilot program like this would give us a better idea of what the benefits of limited universal health care and what kind of changes would need to be made - what works and what doesn't. Since the percentage of people serving in the armed forces versus the population of the whole country is so limited, it would be easier to scale up the VA system for a health care trial versus starting a system from scratch. Considering the fact that in the US private sector the outcome per private health care dollar spent is abysmal this should be worth a trial. Also after a few years try adding their families to the system. This, too, would be complete care including OB-GYN and pediatric.

If that works out and Republicans don't have massive strokes, try starting it with civilians in a limited area, like a part of a state that has a stable population and see what the pros and cons are.

Yeah, I know. I'm just dreaming.

August 4, 2022

After mulling troll Rand Paul's idea let's turn his snark on its head.

Rambling thoughts after watching senator with squirrel on his head make his nasty comments about why not claim asthma, etc. as service connected because of the number of vets who get asthma by a certain age, blah, blah.

It occurred to me --- YES, treat every veteran who has been honorably discharged in the VA system, whether it's for asthma or a broken foot or brain injury - whatever. The process of undergoing evaluation of whether something is a service related condition can be long, expensive, often frustrating and demeaning to the veteran, and can be an unnecessary expense to the VA system. Let's try a pilot program and see if it doesn't actually save the government money in the long run. One of my 3 brothers who are vets actually died of a service-related condition, so I know it can be expensive. Also we now know for sure that many conditions truly are service connected but do not show up immediately.

This would entail enlarging the VA and getting some more medical personnel but look at it from another perspective. Say the veteran eventually ended up with an ACA policy and that would cost the government something and money being fungible, it's just coming from a different bucket. The thing is, if a vet gets appropriate treatment from the time he is discharged, it is a good bet he would be healthier in the long run having a regular long-term doctor and ancillary personnel knowing if he needs treatment and he would get it. The result should be a better and longer life.

The other point is that the VA is the closest we have to universal health care for those who qualify. Enlarging this cohort who quality through a pilot program like this would give us a better idea of what the benefits of limited universal health care and what kind of changes would need to be made - what works and what doesn't. Since the percentage of people serving in the armed forces versus the population of the whole country is so limited, it would be easier to scale up the VA system for a health care trial versus starting a system from scratch. Considering the fact that in the US private sector the outcome per private health care dollar spent is abysmal this should be worth a trial. Also after a few years try adding their families to the system. This, too, would be complete care including OB-GYN and pediatric.

If that works out and Republicans don't have massive strokes, try starting it with civilians in a limited area, like a part of a state that has a stable population and see what the pros and cons are.

Yeah, I know. I'm just dreaming.
















Profile Information

Name: Judy
Gender: Female
Hometown: Western PA
Home country: USA
Current location: Millersville, Maryland
Member since: Sun Oct 4, 2020, 11:42 PM
Number of posts: 1,654

About halfulglas

I'm retired, ex-medical secretary, ex-medical transcriptionist. A grandmother. Lifelong Democrat.

Journal Entries

Latest Discussions»halfulglas's Journal