HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Retired » Retired Groups » Bernie Sanders (Group) » Bernie's coming to Raleig... » Reply #25

Response to StandingInLeftField (Reply #24)

Thu Mar 10, 2016, 07:53 PM

25. Here's an excerpt, could be just normal aging in eyes:

Nuclear Sclerosis Is a Normal Change in Aging Eyes

Nuclear sclerosis is considered a normal change to the lenses of the eyes. It usually develops in both eyes simultaneously and is often seen in animals over the age of six. The condition isnít painful. It comes on gradually, and pets are able to adapt very well to the minor changes in vision that occur.

In younger animals, the lens of the eye is clear because it is composed of tissue fibers that are perfectly organized. But as a pet grows older, more and more fibers are deposited to the outer rings of the lens. Since the lens resides inside a capsule and canít expand to accommodate the additional fibers, the new fibers push the older fibers close together and toward the center of the lens. This compression causes the lens to harden and cloud over.

Nuclear Sclerosis or Cataracts?

The only clinical symptom of nuclear sclerosis is a cloudy appearance of the lens of the eye. Occasionally, a pet will develop mild problems judging distance and range.

Most veterinarians can quickly tell the difference between nuclear sclerosis and a more serious problem, like cataracts, with an ophthalmologic exam. The corneas are typically checked first, often using a device called a slit lamp. If thereís cloudiness on or just behind the cornea, the problem is not nuclear sclerosis.

When your vet (or a veterinary ophthalmologist) looks deeper into the eye with an ophthalmoscope, which may require the use of medicated drops in your petís eyes, he or she will be able to see all the way through to the retina if nuclear sclerosis is present. If the problem is a cataract, it will partially or completely block the view of the retina. If your vet canít see through the lens, neither can your pet.

Unlike cataracts, nuclear sclerosis doesnít seriously affect vision and no treatment is necessary. And if your pet has nuclear sclerosis, it doesnít mean she will automatically also develop cataracts. However, if you notice your petís eyes taking on a different color, itís very important that your vet make sure itís nuclear sclerosis and not another more serious eye condition.

Reply to this post

Back to OP Alert abuse Link to post in-thread

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 28 replies Author Time Post
nc4bo Mar 2016 OP
SmittynMo Mar 2016 #1
nc4bo Mar 2016 #3
SmittynMo Mar 2016 #4
nc4bo Mar 2016 #5
VulgarPoet Mar 2016 #2
nc4bo Mar 2016 #9
Gwhittey Mar 2016 #6
nc4bo Mar 2016 #7
marions ghost Mar 2016 #8
nc4bo Mar 2016 #11
marions ghost Mar 2016 #13
nc4bo Mar 2016 #15
marions ghost Mar 2016 #18
marions ghost Mar 2016 #14
nc4bo Mar 2016 #16
marions ghost Mar 2016 #17
nc4bo Mar 2016 #19
marions ghost Mar 2016 #20
nc4bo Mar 2016 #21
marions ghost Mar 2016 #22
StandingInLeftField Mar 2016 #10
nc4bo Mar 2016 #12
Donkees Mar 2016 #23
StandingInLeftField Mar 2016 #24
LineLineLineLineNew Reply Here's an excerpt, could be just normal aging in eyes:
Donkees Mar 2016 #25
StandingInLeftField Mar 2016 #26
Donkees Mar 2016 #27
StandingInLeftField Mar 2016 #28
Please login to view edit histories.