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TexasTowelie

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Gender: Male
Hometown: Texas
Home country: United States
Current location: Red Hell Texas
Member since: Sun Aug 14, 2011, 03:57 AM
Number of posts: 76,960

About Me

Middle-aged white guy who believes in justice and equality for all. Math and computer analyst with additional 21st century jack-of-all-trades skills. I'm a stud, not a dud!

Journal Archives

Shooters' Shooter Shoots Shot To Become Shooters Mascot By Shooting Several Shots


SHOOTERS - THE OFFICIAL BAR OF THE BILLINGS POLICE DEPARTMENT SINCE 1970



On Saturday, Shooters Casino and Sports Bar held its first ever shooting competition, the winner to become the bar’s official mascot.

Before the competition, Billings Police Chief Rich St. John commented, “The Billings Police Department has been an ardent supporter of the bar since the beginning, for obvious reasons. I would be surprised if there was anyone that could replace us here.”

The competition itself drew several participants, but only one made it to the final round. Owner Michael Morgan told the Beet about the atypical bar game: “We called it Shots on Shots on Shots. Stage one was taking several shots of the bartender’s choice. Stage two was firing several shots inside the building. And Stage three was being judged by a panel of sharp shooters from the BPD.”

Though the bar was crowded with attendees, only one participant made it through the last two phases. According to judges, the BPD was the clear winner still, but a later social media post thanked the second place winner for shooting her shot at taking on the BPD for Best Shooter in Shooters.

https://www.thebillingsbeet.com/local/shooters

Yes, this is satire.

Refugio divided over school's fight song

The Refugio School Board voted Monday night to keep its school fight song, "Dixie," by a vote of 5-2.

An item on Monday's night's meeting agenda reads "Consider discontinuing the use of the Refugio High School fight song."

School board president Andy Rocha, vice-president Kelley Walker and board members Lorraine Garcia, Ethel Garza and T. Wayne Price. Secretary Jorge Jaso and board member Eugene "Bull" Lewis were the dissenting votes.

"Dixie" has long been associated with racism and the confederacy. It was composed in 1859 as a minstrel show, a popular form of entertainment in the day in which white actors wore blackface. It has been called the unofficial anthem of the Confederacy. It also was featured in the 1915 movie "The Birth of a Nation," which is credited with rekindling the Ku Klux Klan.

Read more: https://www.kristv.com/refugio-divided-over-school%27s-fight-song

Wyoming gas revenues down 74% in 'new reality'

As leaders scramble to prop up the state’s troubled coal industry, a “new reality” threatens from another key sector: Declining natural gas production has cut Wyoming’s annual gas tax income 74% in 12 years.

In its best performing year in the last two decades — 2006 — natural gas generated upwards of 3.5 times more mineral severance taxes for Wyoming than coal, according to calculations from state revenue forecasters’ figures. The $669.5 million in taxes that year also far outpaced mineral severance taxes generated by crude oil.

Although experts say it’s unfair to compare the coalbed-methane boom of the mid-2000s to today’s energy landscape, they are predicting a continuing decline in natural gas revenues. When coupled with the slumping coal industry, the loss of natural gas revenue is creating a “new reality,” Sen. Cale Case (R-Lander) said recently.

“When I began serving in the Legislature, we believed coal would last 200 years,” Case said in a statement as Gov. Mark Gordon announced a planning effort to better report about Wyoming’s energy future. But annual mineral severance tax revenue from coal in 2019 will be down 38% from its zenith in 2011, according to WyoFile calculations from figures provided by state revenue forecasters.

Read more: https://www.wyofile.com/wyo-gas-revenues-down-74-in-new-reality/

New programs approved at University of Wyoming

LARAMIE, Wyo. — The board of trustees at the University of Wyoming has voted unanimously in approval of several new educational programs.

The Laramie Boomerang reports voting, which took place during the board’s November meeting, granted approval for a new computer science education certificate, a master’s in “environment and natural resources in society,” and go-ahead for a neuroscience and early childhood education bachelor’s degrees.

Planned to become available spring semester 2020, the on-campus as well as online computer certificate program, will be collaboratively offered by UW’s College of Engineering and College of Education. It provides opportunity for Wyoming educators to be endorsed for the teaching of computer sciences to their own students, a move UW associate vice provost for undergraduate education, Anne Alexander described as especially relevant now that the Wyoming Legislature has mandated such teaching in K-12 schools.

According to a report from the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs, $7,000 dollars was requested, and approved, in order to implement online teaching of the courses, which includes hiring of an “instructional designer.”

Read more: https://buckrail.com/new-programs-approved-at-university-of-wyoming/

Wyoming lawmakers are trying to give coal-fired power plants a fighting chance

The future is not looking bright for coal. As the industry in Wyoming tumbles, lawmakers are scrambling to prepare the state for a forthcoming domino effect of coal-fired power plant retirements.

National demand for thermal coal, mainly used to produce electricity, has continued to sink. Utilities have pivoted away from coal to cheaper natural gas and renewable energy sources that save ratepayers money. Last month, Moody’s Investors Service forecast Powder River Basin coal production will slip even more next year and catalyze “at least a few” coal mine closures.

This comes as Wyoming’s leading utility company plans to shutter two-thirds of its national coal fleet by 2030. To ensure ratepayers the lowest cost electricity in the coming decades, units at Naughton in Kemmerer, Jim Bridger near Rock Springs and Dave Johnston in Glenrock will be on the chopping block. PacifiCorp will first retire Jim Bridger’s unit 1 in 2023.

For decades, utility commissions have regulated the private companies providing electricity with the goal of maintaining a healthy energy grid, buoying the economy and protecting consumers’ pocket books.

Read more: https://trib.com/business/energy/wyoming-lawmakers-are-trying-to-give-coal-fired-power-plants/article_8cb63c68-9baf-566e-b03d-1447184c142e.html

Kanye West denied permit for amphitheater on Wyoming ranch

CODY (AP) — Kanye West has been denied a permit to build an amphitheater on his ranch in Wyoming.

The Park County Planning and Zoning Commission made the decision Tuesday after the rapper changed his plans for the structure near Cody.

West told county officials he now wants to include residential space.

The Cody Enterprise reports that county officials also object to West already having done considerable work at the site. They told West’s representatives to stop work immediately.

Read more: https://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/kanye-west-denied-permit-for-amphitheater-on-wyoming-ranch/article_de8d129a-ff76-52c8-ad18-bdb2b396a444.html

Regulators Reject Higher Costs for Those With Solar Power

BILLINGS, MONT. (AP) — Montana utility regulators have rejected a proposal by NorthWestern Energy to greatly increase rates when customers with rooftop solar systems need power from the grid.

The Billings Gazette reports the Public Service Commission said Monday NorthWestern hadn’t provided enough information to justify the charge.

NorthWestern argued net metering customers, who are credited for surplus power they export to the grid, buy such small amounts of electricity that other customers were unfairly shouldering the cost for the utility’s infrastructure.

NorthWestern proposed charging $7.69 per kilowatt hour of electricity used during the hour of highest energy use each month. NorthWestern charges about 6.7 cents per kilowatt hour.

Read more: https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/montana/articles/2019-11-25/regulators-reject-higher-costs-for-those-with-solar-power

Rare-earth research could occur in Campbell County

GILLETTE (WNE) — The U.S. Department of Energy wants to research the extraction of rare earth elements in the western part of the country, and Campbell County could be the place where that research will be done.

The University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources hopes to partner with the DOE and its National Energy Technology Laboratory to do that research and needs the support of local governments.

The Gillette City Council considered a commitment letter in support of the project at a special meeting Thursday afternoon, while Campbell County Commissioners did the same at the end of their Public Health meeting Thursday night.

Scott Quillinan, director of research at the School of Energy Resources, said UW has been studying the coal seams in the Powder River Basin to measure the concentration of rare earth elements. There’s reason to continue that research, he said, because PRB coal has rare earth potential.

Read more: https://trib.com/business/energy/rare-earth-research-could-occur-in-campbell-county/article_72fe736c-7a09-53af-99a8-73c5a893171d.html
(Casper Star Tribune)

Blackjewel bankruptcy case far from over

When the sale of two Wyoming coal mines between bankrupt coal operator Blackjewel and Eagle Specialty Materials closed last month, coal communities in the Powder River Basin breathed a sigh of relief. Though Wyoming miners started trickling back to work at the Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr coal mines this month under new ownership, the bankruptcy case involving their former employer Blackjewel has continued to sputter along in federal court.

It’s likely far from over.

In the latest development in the bankruptcy case that’s stretched well into its fifth month, the U.S. Interior Department submitted a motion to federal bankruptcy court Tuesday stating Blackjewel owes nearly $886,000 in royalty payments and fees for coal produced after the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

This outstanding payment is in addition to the approximately $50 million in unpaid royalties, rent and other charges Blackjewel owed the federal government at the time the company filed for bankruptcy on July 1.

When Blackjewel filed for bankruptcy this summer, attempts to line up needed debtor-in-possession funding, or interim loans, to continue operating its 32 mines across the country flopped.

Read more: https://trib.com/business/energy/blackjewel-bankruptcy-case-far-from-over/article_dac82152-f6df-563f-a1b4-eadf3cc937af.html
(Casper Star Tribune)

Wyoming lawmakers are trying to give coal-fired power plants a fighting chance

The future is not looking bright for coal. As the industry in Wyoming tumbles, lawmakers are scrambling to prepare the state for a forthcoming domino effect of coal-fired power plant retirements.

National demand for thermal coal, mainly used to produce electricity, has continued to sink. Utilities have pivoted away from coal to cheaper natural gas and renewable energy sources that save ratepayers money. Last month, Moody’s Investors Service forecast Powder River Basin coal production will slip even more next year and catalyze “at least a few” coal mine closures.

This comes as Wyoming’s leading utility company plans to shutter two-thirds of its national coal fleet by 2030. To ensure ratepayers the lowest cost electricity in the coming decades, units at Naughton in Kemmerer, Jim Bridger near Rock Springs and Dave Johnston in Glenrock will be on the chopping block. PacifiCorp will first retire Jim Bridger’s unit 1 in 2023.

For decades, utility commissions have regulated the private companies providing electricity with the goal of maintaining a healthy energy grid, buoying the economy and protecting consumers’ pocket books.

Read more: https://trib.com/business/energy/wyoming-lawmakers-are-trying-to-give-coal-fired-power-plants/article_8cb63c68-9baf-566e-b03d-1447184c142e.html#tracking-source=home-top-story-1
(Casper Star Tribune)
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