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shrike3

shrike3's Journal
shrike3's Journal
August 15, 2023

A throng of interfaith leaders to focus on combating authoritarianism at global gathering in Chicago


https://www.ncronline.org/news/throng-interfaith-leaders-focus-combating-authoritarianism-global-gathering-chicago?fbclid=IwAR2AZRWlMwcJgosuRWIjlOxnRlXcCGwnaIw2PTeo6TgV-vJMw13BVviBjVM

More than 6,000 people representing scores of religions and belief systems are expected to convene in Chicago starting August 14 for what organizers bill as the world’s largest gathering of interfaith leaders.

For the Parliament of the World’s Religions, the week-long event marks a return to its roots – the organization was founded in Chicago in 1893. In the past 30 years, it has convened six times, most recently in Toronto in 2018.

Past gatherings have drawn participants from more than 80 nations. This week’s speakers and presenters will represent Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Baha’i, Hinduism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Sikhism, Indigenous religions, paganism and other beliefs.

This year’s theme is "A Call to Conscience: Defending Freedom and Human Rights," with a focus on combating authoritarianism around the world. Topics on the agenda include climate change, human rights, food insecurity, racism and women’s rights.

Scheduled speakers include U.N. Secretary General António Guterres, former U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul and actor Rainn Wilson, a member of the Baha’i faith. The keynote speaker will be Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson.

Illustrative of the parliament’s diversity, its program chair for this week’s event is Phyllis Curott, a Wiccan priestess who as an author and lawyer has advocated for the legal rights of witches.
August 13, 2023

Pope Francis to 1.5 million youth in Portugal: Be 'beacons of hope in dark times'

https://www.ncronline.org/vatican/vatican-news/pope-francis-15-million-youth-portugal-be-beacons-hope-dark-times?fbclid=IwAR3H3HKyC1Va6DOW_UEpCH95K4E6TacHpmUecYVAVSyVqrfnatY8ha1mVFs

With war raging in Europe and ever increasing polarization throughout the world, Pope Francis on Aug. 6 told a massive gathering of more than 1.5 million young people to choose dialogue over isolation and to be "beacons of hope in dark times."

Christians, the pope said, are called "to love our neighbors as they are, not only when they agree with us, but also when they are unkind or disagreeable."


The pope's remarks came during the closing Mass for the World Youth Day celebrations, which drew hundreds of thousands of young people from more than 200 countries here to the Portuguese capital for the weeklong festivities.

In what local authorities were describing as the largest event in the history of the nation, young people slept out all night along the banks of the Tagus River to be present with the 86-year-old pope, who consistently used the week's events to underscore the importance of intergenerational relationships.

Non-Catholics, please observe our safe haven rules.
June 29, 2023

Supreme Court says a conviction for online threats violated 1st Amendment


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2023/06/27/supreme-court-true-threat-stalking/?fbclid=IwAR0DzmNrZDQLQaDIZ5h9ccmtswlspwrHHYtphtOhJRDTP6iXGYnti8Dhb78

The Supreme Court on Tuesday reversed the conviction of a man who made extensive online threats to a stranger, saying free speech protections require prosecutors to prove the stalker was aware of the threatening nature of his communications.

In a 7-2 ruling with Justice Elena Kagan writing for the majority, the court emphasized that true threats of violence are not protected by the First Amendment. But to guard against a chilling effect on non-threatening speech, the majority said, states must prove that a criminal defendant has acted recklessly, meaning that he “disregarded a substantial risk that his communications would be viewed as threatening violence.”

The case concerned a Colorado law used to convict Billy Raymond Counterman of stalking and causing “emotional distress” to Coles Whalen, a singer-songwriter he had never met. Counterman, who had previously been convicted of making threats to others, served four years in prison in the Whalen case.

Whalen testified at Counterman’s trial, and told The Washington Post in an interview, that she was terrified by Counterman’s relentless pursuit. She said she never knew whether her stalker would be in the crowd at her performances. The worry affected her mental health, caused her to cancel concerts and hampered her career and even caused her for a time to give up performing, she said.

Sorry if this has already been posted.
June 15, 2023

Pride month at Holy Trinity parish in Washington D.C.


Non-Catholics are MORE than welcome to comment, so long as they observe our rules. (Pinned at the top.)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/pride-backlash-targets-catholics-who-are-trying-to-be-more-like-jesus/ar-AA1cBn1J?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=9b79887dec0d4c5aa83dc341cae53616&ei=10

The ministry was founded thanks to “a commitment by the Jesuit order to make sure that the spiritual needs of all marginalized community are being met,” said Ernie Raskauskas, 71, who has been a Holy Trinity parishioner for decades.

He went to Gonzaga College High School, Holy Cross College, Catholic University. He’s got the Catholic bona fides. In Georgetown, he finally found a place to be Catholic and gay after the Jesuits “decided that the LGBTQIA communities were very marginalized, that our spiritual needs weren’t being met, and that they were going to make a special effort on this.”

The parishioners are all deeply Catholic and found a place at Holy Trinity — and nearly everyone I spoke with said this explicitly — where they can be fully themselves.

“It may be difficult to be queer in Catholic spaces,” said Cerissa Cafasso, 40. “But it can also be a challenge to be Catholic in progressive spaces.”

She’s a lawyer and bisexual and never gave up on practicing Catholicism but wasn’t totally comfortable until she came to Holy Trinity. “I can be myself, my full person, with no throat clearing.”
April 5, 2023

Happy Holy Week


I actually enjoy the Triduum. Hope you do, too.
February 15, 2023

Happy St. Valentine's Day to all who frequent this group.


Sorry, it's a little late. We've had a mundane holiday here, trying to fix a broken dishwasher. But, I guess that's love, too. Hope everyone had a great day.
December 13, 2022

End game How the visionary hospice movement became a for-profit hustle


My apologies if this has been posted before.

https://www.propublica.org/article/hospice-healthcare-aseracare-medicare

Over the years, Marsha Farmer had learned what to look for. As she drove the back roads of rural Alabama, she kept an eye out for dilapidated homes and trailers with wheelchair ramps. Some days, she’d ride the one-car ferry across the river to Lower Peach Tree and other secluded hamlets where a few houses lacked running water and bare soil was visible beneath the floorboards. Other times, she’d scan church prayer lists for the names of families with ailing members.

Farmer was selling hospice, which, strictly speaking, is for the dying. To qualify, patients must agree to forgo curative care and be certified by doctors as having less than six months to live. But at AseraCare, a national chain where Farmer worked, she solicited recruits regardless of whether they were near death. She canvassed birthday parties at housing projects and went door to door promoting the program to loggers and textile workers. She sent colleagues to cadge rides on the Meals on Wheels van or to chat up veterans at the American Legion bar. “We’d find run-down places where people were more on the poverty line,” she told me. “You’re looking for uneducated people, if you will, because you’re able to provide something to them and meet a need.”

Farmer, who has doe eyes and a nonchalant smile, often wore scrubs on her sales routes, despite not having a medical background. That way, she said, “I would automatically be seen as a help.” She tried not to mention death in her opening pitch, or even hospice if she could avoid it. Instead, she described an amazing government benefit that offered medications, nursing visits, nutritional supplements and light housekeeping — all for free. “Why not try us just for a few days?” she’d ask families, glancing down at her watch as she’d been trained to do, to pressure them into a quick decision.

Once a prospective patient expressed interest, a nurse would assess whether any of the person’s conditions fit — or could be made to fit — a fatal prognosis. The Black Belt, a swath of the Deep South that includes parts of Alabama, has some of the highest rates of heart disease, diabetes and emphysema in the country. On paper, Farmer knew, it was possible to finesse chronic symptoms, like shortness of breath, into proof of terminal decline.
October 23, 2022

"We're a failed state now."


So said a very charming Brit we met at the airport. He was cheerful in that way that people get when they've seen it all. "PM lasted 44 days. How is that not a failed state?"

He was joking, of course. He knows they're not Somalia. OTOH, the night before, during dinner at a pub, Hubs and I watched the TV as the talking heads breathlessly discussed Truss' resignation. The looks on the faces of the locals around us. Disgust. Frustration. Hubs and I could at least feel some solidarity, given the situation in our country.
June 14, 2022

The Catholic bishops support gun control. Why don't we hear more about it?


https://www.ncronline.org/news/opinion/catholic-bishops-support-gun-control-why-dont-we-hear-more-about-it

In response to recent mass shootings, Pope Francis and the U.S. Catholic bishops have called for gun control measures that would save lives. This undoubtedly surprises some people who think that abortion is the only public policy concern of the church's hierarchy. Sadly, the media and the bishops themselves give too little attention to the larger "life" agenda.

While praying for the children killed and their families in Uvalde, the pope did not hesitate to say, "It is time to say enough to the indiscriminate trafficking of arms."

Francis has frequently denounced gun trafficking, including in his 2015 address to a joint session of Congress. "Why are deadly weapons being sold to those who plan to inflict untold suffering on individuals and society?" he asked U.S. lawmakers. "Sadly, the answer, as we all know, is simply for money: money that is drenched in blood, often innocent blood."

I think the answer is pretty obvious why we don't hear about it. The bishops would rather talk about abortion.

Non-Catholics/non-believers are more than welcome to comment so long as they observe the following rules:

"Welcome to the Catholic & Orthodox Group. This is a safe haven group where discussions about Catholicism and Orthodoxy take place in a forum free from gratuitous attacks or derision of religion and religious beliefs. There are other places for those who really like to do that. Our focus is on the beliefs and traditions of Catholicism and Orthodoxy. For the rest, welcome, and pax vobiscum. Peace be among you.


"Constructive criticism of the politics of the Catholic hierarchy is permitted, but no incendiary attacks on the Catholic and/or Orthodox faiths will be tolerated."


March 31, 2022

Ukrainians fleeing terror at home find solace in Polish church

https://www.globalsistersreport.org/news/ministry/news/ukrainians-fleeing-terror-home-find-solace-polish-church

Though the family, who had lived outside the capital of Kyiv, were brought up in the Orthodox tradition — as are most Ukrainians — differences between Orthodox and Catholic traditions and theologies mean little right now, Opanasuk said. (The Krakow parish acknowledges Pope Francis as the head of the church but practices Byzantine liturgy similar to that in the Orthodox tradition.)

What is important to Opanasuk is that she and her family are safely in Krakow, living with a Polish-American couple who volunteered to take them in and finding some solace as they contemplate next moves and try to make sense of their fate — and their country's.

Opanasuk's 62-year-old sister-in-law, also named Ludmyla but hesitant to give her full name, said she feels enormous anger over the Russian invasion and being uprooted.

"Bitter," she said. "Bitter. We were afraid for our lives."

Yet being at the church — even for a few minutes during the week to pray, sit in quiet contemplation or have the chance to talk to Senyk and another sister — is a balm, the women say.

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