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cbabe

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Member since: Wed Jun 2, 2021, 01:24 PM
Number of posts: 1,089

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Farms in Central Washington boost their yield with solar energy


https://crosscut.com/environment/2022/06/farms-central-washington-boost-their-yield-solar-energy

Farms in Central Washington boost their yield with solar energy

Two greenhouse domes on the Colville Reservation will house the state’s first 'agrivoltaics' project, where food and electricity can grow in tandem on small acreage.

by John Stang / June 22, 2022

Two geodesic domes are being built in Nespelem, 16 miles north of the Grand Coulee Dam and the headquarters of the Colville Indian Reservation. Ricky Gabriel jokes that they look like Thunderdome from the dystopian 1985 movie Mad Max.
Gabriel, an Okanogan County contractor, sees the Nespelem domes as a challenging math puzzle, requiring precisely cut and fit wood braces to create the ball-like structures that will be covered by transparent crystal plastic to become greenhouses.

The domes consist of 20 straight sides that create half-balls that are almost 20 feet tall and 35 feet in diameter. They each make room for roughly 1,000 square feet of crop space to grow a variety of vegetables and flowers, spread out horizontally and stacked on shelves vertically.

These compact growing spaces also leave room for solar energy to grow outside. An adjacent two rows of solar panels will be capable of producing 20 kilowatt-hours a year.

The solar cells will provide electricity to heat and run the watering equipment for the domes. The food and surplus electricity will go directly to nearby homes. And the planning and execution of this so-called agrivoltaic project will be an example to be spread across the grid to planners, farmers and engineers interested in learning more about this new way of using farmland to grow both food and electricity at the same time.

“The community is very excited about it,” said Tauni Bearcub, the project’s manager for Konbit (pronounced “kone-beet”), a Boulder, Colorado, company specializing in food-growing programs with an emphasis on Native American lands. She is also a member of the Colville nation.

…more…

Farms in Central Washington boost their yield with solar energy

https://crosscut.com/environment/2022/06/farms-central-washington-boost-their-yield-solar-energy

Farms in Central Washington boost their yield with solar energy

Two greenhouse domes on the Colville Reservation will house the state’s first 'agrivoltaics' project, where food and electricity can grow in tandem on small acreage.

by John Stang / June 22, 2022

Two geodesic domes are being built in Nespelem, 16 miles north of the Grand Coulee Dam and the headquarters of the Colville Indian Reservation. Ricky Gabriel jokes that they look like Thunderdome from the dystopian 1985 movie Mad Max.
Gabriel, an Okanogan County contractor, sees the Nespelem domes as a challenging math puzzle, requiring precisely cut and fit wood braces to create the ball-like structures that will be covered by transparent crystal plastic to become greenhouses.

The domes consist of 20 straight sides that create half-balls that are almost 20 feet tall and 35 feet in diameter. They each make room for roughly 1,000 square feet of crop space to grow a variety of vegetables and flowers, spread out horizontally and stacked on shelves vertically.

These compact growing spaces also leave room for solar energy to grow outside. An adjacent two rows of solar panels will be capable of producing 20 kilowatt-hours a year.

The solar cells will provide electricity to heat and run the watering equipment for the domes. The food and surplus electricity will go directly to nearby homes. And the planning and execution of this so-called agrivoltaic project will be an example to be spread across the grid to planners, farmers and engineers interested in learning more about this new way of using farmland to grow both food and electricity at the same time.

“The community is very excited about it,” said Tauni Bearcub, the project’s manager for Konbit (pronounced “kone-beet”), a Boulder, Colorado, company specializing in food-growing programs with an emphasis on Native American lands. She is also a member of the Colville nation.

…more…







Young people go to European court to stop treaty that aids fossil fuel investors

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jun/21/young-people-go-to-european-court-to-stop-treaty-that-aids-fossil-fuel-investors

Young people go to European court to stop treaty that aids fossil fuel investors

Young victims of the climate crisis will on Tuesday launch legal action at Europe’s top human rights court against an energy treaty that protects fossil fuel investors.

Five people, aged between 17 and 31, who have experienced devastating floods, forest fires and hurricanes are bringing a case to the European court of human rights, where they will argue that their governments’ membership of the little-known energy charter treaty (ECT) is a dangerous obstacle to action on the climate crisis. It is the first time that the Strasbourg court will be asked to consider the treaty, a secretive investor court system that enables fossil fuel companies to sue governments for lost profits.

…more…



When is the us going to stop subsidizing oil/gas corporations?

Young people go to European court to stop treaty that aids fossil fuel investors

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jun/21/young-people-go-to-european-court-to-stop-treaty-that-aids-fossil-fuel-investors

Young people go to European court to stop treaty that aids fossil fuel investors

Young victims of the climate crisis will on Tuesday launch legal action at Europe’s top human rights court against an energy treaty that protects fossil fuel investors.

Five people, aged between 17 and 31, who have experienced devastating floods, forest fires and hurricanes are bringing a case to the European court of human rights, where they will argue that their governments’ membership of the little-known energy charter treaty (ECT) is a dangerous obstacle to action on the climate crisis. It is the first time that the Strasbourg court will be asked to consider the treaty, a secretive investor court system that enables fossil fuel companies to sue governments for lost profits.

…more…



When is the us going to stop subsidizing oil/gas corporations?



Texas GOP lashes Out at Gays with Support from Verizon

Texas GOP Lashes Out at Gays with Support from Verizon

https://www.thestranger.com/slog-am/2022/06/20/75342316/slog-am-texas-gop-lashes-out-at-gays-with-support-from-verizon-long-lost-wicked-witch-located-and-why-are-seattle-streets-so-deadly

The Texas GOP has officially declared homosexuality an “abnormal lifestyle choice.” Delegates voted to approve particularly homophobic elements in the party platform this weekend, including an endorsement of abusive ex-gay therapy. None of it would have been possible without help from the Texas GOP’s major donors: Verizon, Anheuser Busch, AT&T, and more.

Texas GOP lashes Out at Gays with Support from Verizon

Texas GOP Lashes Out at Gays with Support from Verizon

https://www.thestranger.com/slog-am/2022/06/20/75342316/slog-am-texas-gop-lashes-out-at-gays-with-support-from-verizon-long-lost-wicked-witch-located-and-why-are-seattle-streets-so-deadly

The Texas GOP has officially declared homosexuality an “abnormal lifestyle choice.” Delegates voted to approve particularly homophobic elements in the party platform this weekend, including an endorsement of abusive ex-gay therapy. None of it would have been possible without help from the Texas GOP’s major donors: Verizon, Anheuser Busch, AT&T, and more.

Charles Blockson's grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove h


Charles Blockson's grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove h

Charles Blockson's grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove h

https://nordot.app/910807409226022912?c=592622757532812385

Charles Blockson’s grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove her wrong

Blockson wrote about the fourth-grade incident in his memoir: "Damn Rare: The Memoirs of an African-American Bibliophile." He had raised his hand to ask his teacher why she never discussed Black people’s historical achievements.

The teacher replied: “Negroes have no history. They were born to serve white people.”

From that day on, he would make it his life’s mission to search for, collect, preserve, and teach the history of Black people in America and all over the world.



The Centre Theater Gallery exhibition chronicles his life and work as a historian, author, bibliophile, and collector of books, historical documents, art, and other items about the history of Black Americans and Black people all over the world.

Blockson curated both the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection at Temple University Libraries and the Charles L. Blockson Collection of African-Americana and the African Diaspora at Penn State University Libraries. His achievement has been compared to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture that Arturo Alfonso Schomburg , an Afro-Puerto Rican, founded in New York in 1925.

In 2010, Blockson donatedHarriet Tubman’s shawl, along with other Tubman artifacts to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, in Washington, D.C., six years before the museum opened in September 2016.

According to the Smithsonian, Queen Victoria had presented the silk lace and linen shawl to the famous abolitionist and Civil War hero in England around 1897.

…more…

Charles Blockson's grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove h

Charles Blockson's grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove h

https://nordot.app/910807409226022912?c=592622757532812385

Charles Blockson’s grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove her wrong

Blockson wrote about the fourth-grade incident in his memoir: "Damn Rare: The Memoirs of an African-American Bibliophile." He had raised his hand to ask his teacher why she never discussed Black people’s historical achievements.

The teacher replied: “Negroes have no history. They were born to serve white people.”

From that day on, he would make it his life’s mission to search for, collect, preserve, and teach the history of Black people in America and all over the world.



The Centre Theater Gallery exhibition chronicles his life and work as a historian, author, bibliophile, and collector of books, historical documents, art, and other items about the history of Black Americans and Black people all over the world.

Blockson curated both the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection at Temple University Libraries and the Charles L. Blockson Collection of African-Americana and the African Diaspora at Penn State University Libraries. His achievement has been compared to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture that Arturo Alfonso Schomburg , an Afro-Puerto Rican, founded in New York in 1925.

In 2010, Blockson donatedHarriet Tubman’s shawl, along with other Tubman artifacts to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, in Washington, D.C., six years before the museum opened in September 2016.

According to the Smithsonian, Queen Victoria had presented the silk lace and linen shawl to the famous abolitionist and Civil War hero in England around 1897.

…more…

Charles Blockson's grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove h

https://nordot.app/910807409226022912?c=592622757532812385

Charles Blockson’s grade school teacher told him Black people have no history. He set out to prove her wrong

Blockson wrote about the fourth-grade incident in his memoir: "Damn Rare: The Memoirs of an African-American Bibliophile." He had raised his hand to ask his teacher why she never discussed Black people’s historical achievements.

The teacher replied: “Negroes have no history. They were born to serve white people.”

From that day on, he would make it his life’s mission to search for, collect, preserve, and teach the history of Black people in America and all over the world.



The Centre Theater Gallery exhibition chronicles his life and work as a historian, author, bibliophile, and collector of books, historical documents, art, and other items about the history of Black Americans and Black people all over the world.

Blockson curated both the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection at Temple University Libraries and the Charles L. Blockson Collection of African-Americana and the African Diaspora at Penn State University Libraries. His achievement has been compared to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture that Arturo Alfonso Schomburg , an Afro-Puerto Rican, founded in New York in 1925.

In 2010, Blockson donatedHarriet Tubman’s shawl, along with other Tubman artifacts to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, in Washington, D.C., six years before the museum opened in September 2016.

According to the Smithsonian, Queen Victoria had presented the silk lace and linen shawl to the famous abolitionist and Civil War hero in England around 1897.

…more…

Nearly a century before Patriot Front, Margaret L. Weaver was confronting the forces of white suprem

https://crosscut.com/mossback/2022/06/meet-woman-who-fought-northwest-nazis

Nearly a century before Patriot Front, Margaret L. Weaver was confronting the forces of white supremacy and intolerance.

by Knute Berger / June 17, 2022

The Spokane area and north Idaho have long been known as a gathering place for right-wing militias and neo-Nazi hi groups. The recent arrest of a cadre of Patriot Front members accused of conspiring to riot at a Pride event in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, is a reminder of the draw the region has. It has long been tagged by white supremacists as the “American Redoubt,” a hoped-for ethnostate in the inland Northwest.

But the area also has produced anti-fascists to counter these efforts. Perhaps the first was a young woman from Spokane who played a major role in what one author has called “the first American uprising against Nazism.” A few years later, she helped lead the first anti-fascist protest in her own hometown.



She lived in Greenwich Village and emerged as a “powerhouse” activist who “had the courage to face down the ruffians of the International Longshoreman’s Union, which controlled the waterfront in a smash-mouth manner,” according to writer Peter Duffy, author of The Agitator, a nonfiction account of anti-Nazi activism that features the seminal protest in 1935 that Weaver helped plan and execute.



In July (1935), the German ocean liner, the S.S. Bremen, came to New York flying a massive swastika flag. Maggie Weaver and her pals planned a protest where, disguised as partygoers, they would board the Bremen before the ship left port and tear its Nazi flag down.

And they did.

…more…Spokane…silver shirts…stolen army weapons… death threats to Roosevelt…Margaret jailed for protesting…
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